Case Studies on Sustainable Communities

These tools correspond with the SLS Student Learning Outcomes

 

 

 

Toolkit Listing

Create Your Own Case Study

Serve-Learn-Sustain case studies are designed to provide real-world examples of sustainable community-building for instructors.  Case studies features in our Teaching Toolkit are of two types.  Some are written by faculty in specific disciplinary styles, while SLS' in-house case studies are intended for use in any discipline.  Your case study should suit this disciplinary standards of your field.  You can refer to our in-house Atlanta BeltLine Case STudy as a template, or look at examples of discipline-specific case studies on these resource pages, for inspiration on writing one that suits your field.

 

When your case study is complete, you will submit it through an online portal (forthcoming).  You will be asked to provide information about your case study, such as its keywords and discipline, and what SLS Student Learning Outcomes it achieves.

ReGenesis Case Study: Creating a Sustainable Community through Collaborative Problem-Solving

This tool uses the ReGenesis case study from Spartanburg, South Carolina, to explore what it means to "create sustainable communities" through broad stakeholder engagement. Spartanburg was found to be experiencing higher levels of health issues due to chemical plants and other polluting factors in the area. ReGenesis, a community-based organization led by community member Harold Mitchell – now a member of the South Carolina legislature –worked with the EPA to use their Collaborative Problem Solving methodology to expose the inequity and turn the community around.

This tool was contributed by Christian Braneon and Delaney Rickles. The affiliated case study, "ReGenesis—A Practical Application of the CPS Model," was written by the EPA. 

SLS Case Study: Atlanta BeltLine

The Atlanta BeltLine is one of the most important urban renewal projects of the 21st century. In this case study, read about the ambitions, successes, and struggles of this project, now in its 12th year. Serve-Learn-Sustain interprets sustainable communities as integrated systems, wherein environmental, economic, and social factors all inform each other. As you read this case study, consider these terms as discrete factors, but also as connected.  This tool was contributed by Dr. Bethany Jacobs.

Multidisciplinary Case Studies

The annotated case studies above are well-suited to courses across Georgia Tech that hope to engage their students in sustainability. Review the options available for your class, and don’t hesitate to recommend a new case study to SLS!

Engineering Case Studies

The annotated case studies included in this tool are well-suited to business courses across the College of Engineering. Review the options available for your class, and don’t hesitate to recommend a new case study to SLS!

Design Case Studies

The annotated case studies included in this tool are well-suited to Design courses across the College of Design. Review the options available for your class, and don’t hesitate to recommend a new case study to SLS! 

Business Case Studies

The annotated case studies included in this tool are well-suited to business courses across the Scheller College of Business. Review the options available for your class, and don’t hesitate to recommend a new case study to SLS!

The University Barbershop: A Case Study (GT Business)

The University Barbershop stands at the corner of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Drive and James P Brawley Drive in Atlanta, GA. Established in 1956, it is one of the oldest barbershops in America. Today, it remains an important center where local boys find mentorship, and patrons find community.  In this case study, barber LaTeef Majaliwa contemplates the unique position of University Barbershop, and wonders how he can strength community impact while also meeting the economic needs of the barbershop and its employees. 

Lateef Majaliwa (University Barbershop) and Bob Myers (Georgia Tech Scheller College of Business) created this case to stimulate discussion around sustainable communities and business. It was supported by the Center for Serve-Learn-Sustain and the Ray C. Anderson Center for Sustainable Business at the Georgia Institute of Technology. (July 2017)