Goal 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities

In-Humanity: Cruelty/Literature/Media Syllabus

“In-Humanity: Cruelty/Literature/Media” is broken up into various categories of violence (war, massacre, genocide, ecological collapse) via literature, diverse media, and policy. We’ll be reading a novel, a graphic novel, short stories, and excerpts from theoretical texts, as well as looking at photographs and videos to investigate both historical and contemporary conflicts and upheavals.

English Composition 2 (Public Interest Technology)

This course focuses on current conversation surrounding disasters, calamities, and apocalyptic events, both in real life and fictional contexts, moving from the context of global perspectives on the end of the world to local efforts to mitigate apocalyptic events.

Atlanta's Persistent Memory

How do we, as (part-time, full-time, or temporary) citizens of Atlanta, uncover the diverse layers of the past which structure our campus, the city, and other places that we inhabit, pass through, or imagine? Atlanta’s streets, avenues, green spaces, and buildings may look permanent but instead are in a constant state of flux. What was here before? What will be here in the future?

Socio-Economic Ecologies of the Atlanta Home

This course focuses on the socio-economic ecologies that support (or not) the sustainable Purpose Built Communities Model. Organizations like the Grove Park Foundation in Atlanta aim to target issues like unequal housing and education through initiatives such as Mixed Income Housing, Cradle-to-College Education, and community health and wellness programs. However, issues like gentrification, environmental degradation, and economic crises hinder this equitable decision making.

The End is Nigh, Eventually: Global and Local Approaches to the Pre-Apocalypse

Apocalypse (noun): From the Greek apokálypsis, 'Uncovering' The end of the world. The great calamity. The apocalypse. Discussions of climate change, natural disasters, pandemics, and violence have become an everyday occurrence, and the rhetoric surrounding these ideas is often nihilistic -- focused on the inevitability of our destruction – or post-apocalyptic – fixated on how humanity recovers after catastrophic events. But what does it mean to experience the time preceding an apocalypse?

Data Science for Policy

This course provides an introduction to public policy analytics. Students will gain hands-on experience with data discovery, measurement, field testing and policy evaluation, including training in data ethics and human subjects protections. Case examples and projects will draw upon both experimental and observational research as well as large-scale civic data on sustainable communities. For Fall 2022, the course is partnering with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored Jump into STEM competition (https://jumpintostem.org) focused on building energy efficiency.

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