SLO 3 - Students will be able to evaluate how decisions impact the sustainability of communities

Vertically Integrated Project: Humanitech

GT faculty are working on a range of ongoing and exploratory humanitarian research topics. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to this research and get them involved to help advance the work. The studio class is team-based and students will work with GT faculty, other university faculty, NGOs and others depending on project needs.

Ecology

Ecology (2335) is a traditional course where students work on applied problems, including those associated with climate change, invasive species, overexploitation etc. The focus is on the ecological concepts, looking at either sustainability or community, with reference to the other, through units, labs, assignments, and activities. 

Extensive and Intensive Reading in Japanese

During the course, the students will read a lot of authentic materials, including energy, environmental issue, and food bank. The student will visit the Atlanta Community Food Bank in order to understand how a local food bank is organized. After reading about the food bank situation in Japan, the students can compare the Atlanta Community Food Bank with what they have learned about Japan. This is one way for students to gain transnational competence so important in today’s world. This course is open to undergraduate and graduate students of all majors. 

Green Construction

The course focuses on strategies and technologies to improve the energy efficiency and performance of buildings, and to reduce the environmental impact of buildings. The course emphasizes technical aspects of building design, materials selection, construction processes, and building operations. The use of objective criteria for assessing building “green-ness”, from meta issues such as building location and site – to operational details such as the selection of cleaning chemicals, is stressed throughout the course.

GT 2000

Transfer students will start their Georgia Tech experience on the right foot with this GT 2000 seminar which covers topics critical to a transfer student’s success. And, through activities and field trips you will also learn the fundamentals of how to shape and be part of a sustainable community. 

Introduction to Land Use

Land use planning touches upon all the core areas of sustainable planning practice, from community development, environmental planning, and economic development, to transportation and mobility.  The course introduces the process of land use planning and shows how the plan document is prepared.  It also discussed the criteria for determining good plans and provides an overview of the tools used for implementing sustainable solutions.  We draw from recent experiences with neo-traditional planning, smart growth, climate sensitive design, and smart city debates.

Special Topics: Environmental Sociology

Natural science can tell us what causes climate change. Engineering gives us the technologies we need to curb climate change. Sociology can explain why, despite having the knowledge and know-how, very little is being done about it. Environmental sociology explores the nexus of human and environmental systems. People exist on Earth and require its resources for survival, but they also exist in constructed social systems that constrain and guide human behavior.

Intro to Educational Tech/Educational Tech Theoretical Foundations

In this course we will use theories on learning and design to develop educational technology that facilitates learning about smart cities and sustainable communities.  Students will learn about the value of understanding audiences, theory, and design methods in creating effective educational technology, in the context of teaching the public about how smart cities could impact their lives.

Honors Biological Principles

The laboratory portions of the BIOL 1511 and 1521 courses are designed as research service-learning labs that integrate relevant community service with academic coursework to enhance learning, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities. In partnership with the Atlanta Botanical Gardens (BIOL 1511) and the Piedmont Park Conservancy (BIOL 1521), students conduct research that benefits learning in biology and the greater Atlanta community.

Macroeconomics of Innovation

The economy and the environment are tightly linked.  In this course, we explore the interconnections between economic activity and environmental stewardship, illustrate the perils of unchecked economic growth, and study possible solutions and policy interventions needed to ensure that economic development is achieved in a sustainable way.

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