SLO 3 - Students will be able to evaluate how decisions impact the sustainability of communities

Residential Design and Construction

The course will move students through the design and construction of a single-family home. We'll work within the constraints a local non-profit developer. The process will move from the due diligence of lot selection and determining the best use for a lot within the guidelines of an organization moving renters to home ownership. Once a legal footprint is established, a home will be designed to include plans, elevations, structural components, and a sustainability plan based on EarthCraft certification. Project presentations will be delivered to the executive team of the non-profit.

History of Urban Form

Understanding cities, the largest and most complex artifacts in human history, is essential as we face the challenges of building a sustainable future. This course is taught from historical vantage points across the globe, recognizing that urban form is shaped by many influences - ecological, technological, cultural, political and economic.

Chemical Product Design

This course provides a product design algorithm that can facilitate design and development of new or improved products. The design process emphasizes the concepts of sustainability, and discusses the impact of products, specifically chemical products on the community. Product design is discussed from the social, cultural and environmental perspectives, whereby the need for technology development for the social good becomes key.

Urban and Regional Economics

In Urban Economics, Atlanta is an interesting city. It is one of the most segregated cities in terms of races and incomes. It is one of the most sprawled cities in the US. This unique features affect your life. For example, children from families at the 25th percentile income in Seattle, have economic outcomes comparable to children from families at the median in Atlanta (Raj et al. 2014). Why do Atlanta kids show this poor performance? We study urban economic theory about your life and city.

Prototyping Practices for Innovation

Prototypes are typically thought of as nearly complete products or technologies which are used to conduct system, alpha or beta testing near the end of a development process. This course is designed to expand on the idea of prototyping and teach how to employ a variety of tools as methods to inspire, contextualize, evaluate and inform any phase of any research or development activity.

Energy and International Security

This course examines issues at the intersection of national energy security, sustainability, and international conflict and cooperation. Is oil import dependence a foreign policy liability or cause war? Do globalization and the interdependence of energy markets favor international cooperation and peace? More specifically, can Saudi Arabia and Russia use hydrocarbon exports as energy weapons? Alternatively, will low oil prices, as well as the promise of natural gas and future exports lock in a strategic pivot away from the Persian Gulf and reinvigorate U.S.

Sustainability, Technology, and Policy

This course - taught on the Pacific Program - will develop a theoretical understanding of sustainability, from a bottom-up perspective that considers ecological outcomes as a function of human institutions. It begins with defining and understanding the tragedy of the commons, and develops an understanding of why we might not be doomed to this tragedy. While exploring broad themes in environmental ethics, philosophy, and management, it will explore cases in the Pacific context, and will include a service-learning project in Fiji.

Comics and Civic Engagement

In this course, students will create research-based comics about a topic related to urban development, particularly in relationship to Atlanta’s underserved West Side neighborhood.  They will then present these comics at an on campus exhibition with the goal of raising awareness about the issues and assets of the West Side. While comics may seem an odd fit for serious issues, many organizations--from the UN to the Alzheimer's Association--and authors have begun using them to explore and educate on such topics as climate change, medical issues, and violence against women.

Social Issues and Public Policy

This course focuses on social issues associated with contemporary American society. While the United States has many benefits and is a nation that many admire, there are several social problems that are misaligned with American values. More specifically, it takes a critical sociological perspective in analyzing U.S. capitalism and its impact on our social institutions, social inequalities, and the quality of our democracy. We particularly focus on comparisons of the U.S. with other affluent, market-based democratic countries in order to understand the uniqueness of American capitalism.

The City in U.S. History

Through a combination of lectures, readings, and discussion, "The City in U.S. History" (HTS 3011) examines the nature of urban life throughout U.S.

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