SLO 3 - Students will be able to evaluate how decisions impact the sustainability of communities

Science, Race, and Technology

LMC 3306 Science, Race, and Technology is known across the GT campus as the "Outkast Class". The products used in the course to interrogate issues of race, class, and community - particularly as it relates to the city of Atlanta - is critically examined through storied "pedagogical performances" of rap duo Outkast. We use these musical artifacts as access points for investigating racial politics, social justice, and cultural innovation in post-Civil Rights Atlanta. This is an undergraduate humanities course.

Poetics of Sustainability: Ecology & Immigration

This course will explore the intersections of ecology and immigration as urgent social, political, and environmental issues through the lens of poetry.

Sustaining Ecologies

The Path Foundation, Trees Atlanta, Friends of the Beltline, ATL Urban Farms, Aware Wildlife Center: these are just some local organizations working to sustain ecologies in Atlanta. Over the course of this class, we will visit and host guests from urban farms and farmer’s markets, as well as wildlife centers, green spaces, and the Beltline, so that students can identify and describe the relationship between the ecological and the social in their communities.

Energy Policy and Markets

The class will introduce students to energy technologies, with specific regards to markets and policy. The objective of the course is to provide the economist’s perspective on a broad range of topics that professionals in the energy industry will encounter.

Women in Science Fiction

Women in Science Fiction studies women writers, artists, and musicians who use science fiction to propose and debate how we might make our world more sustainable. Engaging topics like race, gender, and the environment, these women craft futures that may sometimes appear fantastical or otherwise out of reach. However, this course asserts the real-world stakes of its subject matter for Georgia Tech students. Our readings will spur discussions and assignments about today’s sustainability challenges. This will include an exciting partnership with Prof.

France Today I (Sustainable Communities in France)

NOTE: This course is taught at Georgia Tech Lorraine (GTL) in Metz, France.

Field Work Abroad (Local Sustainability Practices)

NOTE: This course is taught at Georgia Tech Lorraine (GTL) in Metz, France.

The Connell Workshop: The Art of Drawing

The workshop explores a wide range of issues in hand drawing - tone, line, contour, gesture, composition, and the humanistic forces that shape them. The great Renaissance masters, Raphael, Michelangelo, da Vinci and others are used as a research standard for this investigation. Throughout the term we invite guest artists, scientists, life drawing models, and philosophers to participate in the discussion. All these disciplines form the intellectual basis for understanding the world that we inhabit and therefore, the world that we must preserve.

Globalization in the Modern Era

Globalization in the Modern Era (HTS 3055) will examine the social, political and economic bases for the phenomenon frequently referred to as "globalization." The course will discuss competing theories regarding the rise of globalization, as well as the divergent consequences that this process has left in its wake in different communities around the world. While social, economic, political and environmental inequalities are built into some aspects of globalization, the phenomenon also offers new opportunities and alternatives for development and for resistance.

Urban Sociology

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the field of urban sociology by exploring the history and current conditions of cities. This course will be geared toward viewing the city as a simultaneously social, cultural, and political economic phenomenon, with particular attention to the following: a) urbanization and the structure of cities; b) suburbanization; c) sustainable urban growth and economics; d) race and segregation; e) immigration; g) culture; h) gender and sexuality; i) gentrification and housing policy; j) environmental justice; and k) sustainable communities.

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