Yes

Economics of the Environment

Is economic growth incompatible with environmental quality? This course discusses how human social and economic behavior impacts and is impacted by the environment. We discuss how to design policies that promote economically and environmentally sustainable communities such as carbon pricing and property-rights approaches. In addition, we discuss how communities can manage environmental commons problems by relying on local knowledge, norms, and institutions.

Sustainability in American Literary Regionalism

In this section of English 1102, students will read and analyze novels, short stories, and movies grouped together under the genre of American literary regionalism. These texts, created between 1880 and 1950, are concerned with American small towns and rural areas, agriculture and farming science, and community health and development. We will investigate how an earlier generation of writers represented concepts of sustainability and equitability, and how these representations compare to modern-day writing on the same topics.

Policy, Trends, and Ethics in Real Estate Development

Through experiential learning, students of this course will understand sustainability in the built environment and within a community. They will witness the connection between service and profitability as related to property management that helps eliminate transiency which has proven to be a primary contributor to failing public schools. Teams within the class will be assigned real world deliverable that will assist with the mission of the partnered nonprofit.

Sea Level Rise and Coastal Engineering

This course will cover a survey of the modern science of sea level rise and engineering adaptation to ongoing sea level rise. In the first half of the course, students will learn about the Earth system processes which drive sea level rise in Earth’s past and in recent years, and how these processes may change in the future. Students will do a data-driven project exploring historical records of sea level change and variability at individual locations, including a deep dive into the local factors which have driven changes in local sea level.

Race, Medicine, and Science

The primary objective of this course is to study the interrelationship of race, medicine, and science drawing on various literatures such as history, sociology, and anthropology. The course rigorously examines the social, political, and cultural concept of race and its usefulness as an analytical category with a emphasis on American history.

Immoral Energy: Slavery and Fossil Fuels in the Anthropocene

Energy systems are permeated with political and ethical questions, and no historical system demonstrates that as well as transatlantic slavery. Before fossil fuels, the bodies and labor of enslaved peoples powered trade. While at first slavery helped support the expansion of fossil fuels, eventually fossil fuels replaced slavery. This course will explore the ethical/moral valences of energy systems through a juxtaposition of transatlantic slavery and modern fossil fuels. The first half of the class will focus on the abolition debate.

Introduction to Land Use Planning

Land use planning touches upon all the core areas of sustainable planning practice, from community development, environmental planning, and economic development, to transportation/mobility and climate change. The course introduces the process of land use planning and shows how the plan document is prepared. It also discussed the criteria for determining good plans and provides an overview of the tools used for implementing sustainable solutions. We draw from recent experiences with neo-traditional planning, smart growth, climate sensitive design, and smart city debates.

Civil Engineering Systems

In CEE 3000, we learn about civil engineering systems and how to apply the systems approach and a sustainable engineering approach to planning, design, implementation, operation and renewal of systems. Per the Civil Engineering Code of Ethics, the concept of sustainability is the operating paradigm for making decisions across the life cycle of civil engineered facilities. A primary goal of the course is the expand the way we think about civil infrastructure systems from primarily physical to sociotechnical.

Japan Today

Japan Today is a Japanese language course held in Beppu Japan during the summer abroad program that is organized around the theme of environmental sustainability. We discuss topics including solar energy, thermal energy, biomass, garbage disposal, local produce, and the Japanese concept of "mottainai" (trying to avoid wasting things). We also take students on a farmstay, to a geothermal plant, and to an elementary school. This is a community-driven course focused on teaching students how to think about issues of sustainability in Japan.

Information and Communication Technologies and Development

This course focuses on information and communication technology (ICT) design, adoption, and use as seen through the lens of global development. We will begin with studying the history of technological advancement, the global development discourse (from the 1940s to the present era), poverty as experienced, before we engage with the design thinking process. We will then shift our gaze to particular domains of global development, discuss important questions and concerns in these areas of work in the present day, before asking what all this means for us as local and global citizens.

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