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Vertically Integrated Project: 21st Century Global Atlanta

This VIP course brings together students of diverse backgrounds and disciplines to tell the story of Atlanta as a global city, and to increase access to global citizenship at Georgia Tech and nationally. We document and connect with the individuals and communities that are transforming Atlanta into a global metropolis, such as heritage and immigrant communities, foreign-born residents in a variety of professional fields, and thought leaders engaged in the global community.

Sustainable Urban Development

This course introduces the challenges of sustainability as applied to the built environment and the built environment's interconnectivity with the natural environment.  It addresses a range of specific sustainability-related issues such as sprawl and smart growth, climate change, motorized and non-motorized transportation, social equity and environmental justice, green architecture, food systems, and community engagement.  Students will do substantial background reading, engage in class discussion, and apply their skills to a small-group, real-world project.

Sovereignty, Energy, and Settler-Colonialism

The wealth of the United States is premised upon many things: hard work, inventiveness, an entrepreneurial spirit, and so on, but its first premise is land. Land that had been tended and kept by Native Americans. Land that was taken, stolen, or bought over the course of American expansion west. These lands offered new sources of biomass, fossil fuels, and even uranium to exploit. The American energy system benefited from these abundant fuels (in addition to the labor of enslaved Blacks).

Real Estate and Financial Development

The purpose of this course is to enable students to understand the role finance plays in community development. This means understanding the “big picture” and the more detailed mechanics of real estate financial markets, including the roles of developers, investors, lenders, tenants, owners, and the public sector. We will learn financial analysis, how to create and analyze a pro forma, about the development process, but within a framework that addresses broader issues promoting sustainable and inclusive development.

Built Environment and Public Health

This interdisciplinary course, examines how cities and neighborhoods can have both positive and adverse effects on human health, and produces recommendations to improve these outcomes. This SEMINAR is an elective planning and public health course that explores the interconnections between these fields and equips students with skills and experiences to plan healthy, sustainable communities. This course covers planning and public health foundations, natural and built environments, vulnerable populations and health equity, and health policy and global impacts.

Vertically Integrated Project: Global Social Entrepreneurship

This VIP employs the sidekick model of global social entrepreneurship to leverage market forces to accomplish 3 critical objectives. The first is to identify superhero local leaders in the global south who have a long track record of success in transforming their communities with social innovation: with an emphasis on high performance activities of youth. The second is to inspire the world about these largely unknown change agents and their work. The third is to generate resources for these superstar local leaders to expand their incredible work.

Vertically Integrated Project: Building for Equity and Sustainability

This VIP takes as its main focus Georgia Tech’s new Living Building – the Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design – and its efforts to advance social equity as one of seven key performance areas in the Living Building Challenge. This VIP also explore equity and resilience in sustainability projects on Georgia Tech’s campus and in surrounding partner communities in Atlanta.

Atlanta in the 1960s

This course will utilize the materials collected in the Ivan Allen Digital Archive to explore the history of Atlanta in the 1960s through the lens of Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.’s administration (1962-70).

Art/Work in Atlanta

If you feel like you sometimes see the world differently than your friends, family, and classmates, you might just be a documentary filmmaker. This course gives you a framework for trying to put your vision on film. It won't be as hard as you think--it will actually be a lot of fun. The materials for your film are all around you--the people and place of Atlanta provide us with exciting stories, a passionate cast of characters, and beautiful scenes for our film.

Biological Principles

This active learning course is designed to have students work on applied problems, including those associated with climate change and human health, by applying the fundamentals of biology. The course has historically engaged in partnerships with Atlanta biologists, most notably those at Atlanta Audubon to monitor the public health and ecological implications of bird strikes in Atlanta. Note: this lecture course has a co-requisite, previously affiliated service-learning lab.

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