Yes

Un-Natural Disasters

This course will examine how films, novels, and short stories represent the relationship between technology and disaster. We'll trace complicated perceptions of technology back to the Industrial Revolution, seeing how technological innovations have been portrayed as both the cause of and the solution to acute social and environmental problems. We'll then look at depictions of technology in more recent disaster narratives.

Afterlives of Slavery

Students will analyze contemporary representations of the antebellum past in literature and art, and will develop critical thinking skills by researching the historical context that writers and artists respond to in the current moment. The course is structured around a few key questions: how are contemporary communities shaped by the legacy of US slavery? How do writers and artists reimagine the traumatic past in order to comment on contemporary issues of social and environmental injustice?

One World is Not Enough

The course will explore work of contemporary novelists who draw from both eastern and western influences, stories that dwell beyond natural laws of time and space.  The class will consider how these authors expose and influence the changing face of our global community in the twenty-first century.  These novels wrestle with issues of personal and collective memory, accountability, interconnection, and the influence of one's choices and actions on future generations.

Documenting Atlanta

This course will introduce you to the city at your doorstep: you will begin to watch Atlanta and listen to it in ways that enrich your time here and better equip you to make sense of, and perhaps even make long-lasting change in, your adoptive city. We focus on particular places and spaces in the city—from celebrated “Sweet Auburn” Avenue and Martin Luther King Jr.’s boyhood neighborhood to the lesser-known mill community of Cabbagetown—and together read the texts of these communities.

Construction Management and Megaprojects

Sustainable Development of Construction Megaprojects Through Community Engagement: Social, Environmental, and Economic Impacts of Megaprojects - Tools, such as life cycle assessment (LCA), were be introduced to the students to study the human ecology of big projects. Megaprojects were analyzed as displacements that follow a socio-natural process. Students learned the methodology to study changes in the surrounding environments of megaprojects from social, environmental, and economic standpoints.

Multimodal Transportation

Planning, design and operation of systems of air, rail, water and highway facilities, including those for bicycles and pedestrians. In this course, we will focus on the need, purpose and design for multimodality.  Why is a multimodal transportation system important?  How do we plan and design for multimodal transportation?  How do we measure the performance of a multimodal transportation system?  What is a complete street and what guides are available for complete streets design?

Capstone Design

Capstone Design is an interdisciplinary civil and environmental design experience.  Students form teams of 3 – 5 people, and these teams function as “companies” that provide consulting services to a selected sponsor on a specific design project. Students begin the semester responding to an actual Request for Qualifications (RFQ) advertised from a local project sponsor as a team.  Students then select their projects among many different sub-disciplines and themes in order based on their ranking on the RFQ response.

Honors Organismal Biology

The laboratory portions of these courses are designed as research service-learning labs that integrate relevant community service with academic coursework to enhance learning, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities.  In partnership with the Piedmont Park Conservancy, students conduct research that benefits learning in biology and the greater Atlanta community.

Sustainable Community & Systems

We will explore sustainability from a systems perspective, including physical/resource balances, ecological/carbon cycle processes, economic/financial practices, political/policy processes and public participation as they relate to communities in Atlanta and around the world.

Greenovation

Greenovation is a funding initiative hosted by Georgia Tech’s SGA Sustainability Committee, enabling the timely implementation of student-led projects that offer feasible, innovative ideas for improving Georgia Tech’s sustainability efforts. Upon submitting proposals, students will receive feedback from a screening committee prior to evaluation by a judging panel at the Greenovation Proposal Showcase.

Pages

Subscribe to Yes