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GT 1000 Section B01

The theme of this GT 1000 section is campus sustainability. Throughout the duration of the course connections to sustainability will be highlighted. Opportunities for students to engage with sustainability initiatives and to lessen their environmental impact will be shared.

User Interface Design

This project-based course covers the process of designing high-quality user interfaces to computing systems. It walks teams step-by-step through the user-centered design process, resulting in novel UI designs that meet users' needs and even delight them. The class covers theories informing UI design and evaluation, reviews the state of the art in interaction and presentation techniques, including user input techniques and the state of the art in graphical, audio, and haptic feedback.

Energy, Efficiency, and Sustainability

This course addresses energy and environmental assessment from a systems perspective. Designed for students who have already taken ISyE 3025 (Engineering Economics) and Physics 2211 and 2212 (introductory physics) the course provides an introduction to energy analysis and environmental lifecycle assessment, with application to energy efficiency, renewable energy, resource availability and environmental impacts.

Freshman Seminar - Climate Change Focus

The Freshman Seminar course is designed to help students prepare for success in college and reflect on their values, academic plan, and career. Georgia Tech students interested in climate change will not find a clear pipeline from matriculation to graduation to develop skills and knowledge in this area. Our section of GT 1000 is designed to help students chart a course through Georgia Tech, however windy it might be, so that they emerge as climate-conscious citizens prepared to educate others and implement solutions.

GT 1000 SL5

Georgia Tech is deeply committed to sustainability and the environment, and has created an amazing campus that is an urban-living-learning laboratory for hands on education and research. See how and how you can get more involved with the help of two of Tech’s leaders in research and design.

Architecture, Sound, Sustainability

This course in multimedia rhetoric is part of the summer iGniTe SLS program in sustainability. Working from the premise that social equity and communal equity are integral to sustainable futures, the course asserts the importance of sound to our experience of the spaces we live in. It further posits that sound powerfully communicates who belongs in a place or space and who does not, even when that space is designated as public or shared. We will give special attention to spaces in and around Georgia Tech.

Introduction to Research

SHaRP Living Learning Community students only – Students in this course will engage with faculty and professional researchers at Georgia Tech in order to explore the ethical effects of medical research. Students will be challenged to related ethical research to community health by engaging with community partners including the Atlanta Food Bank and Georgia Farmer’s Market Association.

Sustainable Cities Studio

In this course, we partner with Central Atlanta Progress, who recently completed the Downtown Atlanta Master Plan (https://www.atlantadowntown.com/initiatives/master-plan), focusing specifically on the goals outlined in chapter 5 regarding restoration of the urban forest downtown and enhancing green infrastructure. Students will break into disciplinary teams to accomplish two goals: 1. Compile or create evidence to support the planning goals and their outcomes outlined in chapter 5, and 2. Identify opportunities and implementation strategies to enhance green infrastructure downtown.

Social Entrepreneurship

Social enterprises are dedicated to creating social value by attracting private and public funds to address the challenges of society. They may take the form of a nonprofit, for-profit or hybrid organization. These organizations apply business and market principles in their efforts to solve problems not addressed by the private sector and governments. One of the critical tasks of social enterprises is to grow and scale, as the consequences of poverty, environmental issues, education, and human injustices are global and systemic.

Bad Collections

Stockpiles of nuclear weapons, a surfeit of trash in landfills, record high accrual of greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere, eighty-five percent of global wealth concentrated in just ten percent of its occupants: these are just some bad collections that threaten the continued existence of human life on earth. The dangers that these collections pose are obvious, so why is it so hard to disarm, reduce, and redistribute? Why can’t we clean up the messes we make? What if we cannot clean-up because we are already incorporated into the bad collections that overwhelm us?

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