Yes

Special Topics: Equity and Community Engagement

Inequalities between and within communities across the United States have become glaringly obvious in the last several years due to intersecting disasters like poverty, pollution, climate change, and COVID-19. In this course, students will use historical and sociological approaches to explore community assets, vulnerabilities, and inequalities related to these intersecting disasters, as well as learn and apply respectful and appropriate ways to engage with communities during these disastrous times.

Sustainable Communities

This course focuses on social, artistic, cultural, and scientific dimensions of sustainability and the concepts of identity, diversity, social equity and inclusion/exclusion in the French context. This course will introduce students to sustainable communities in France through lectures, projects, videos, downloads from the Internet, and class discussions.

Representing Environmental Justice

Even as the proliferation of new media platforms has made it possible for individuals and institutions to publicize the causes and consequences of climate change to a broader audience than ever before, the interrelationship between environmental degradation and racism remains underrepresented.

Sustainable Communities and the Refugee Experience: The Community, Knowledge, and Praxis of Atlanta-area Refugee Organizations

The questions surrounding the refugee experience are the principal humanistic questions of the twenty-first century. Readings and films in this course will demonstrate how sustainability, growth, and progress must be shaped by an understanding of the life, work, and future of people displaced by war, environmental crises, and violence (including the violence of the state upon its own citizens).

Global Economics

In my section of ECON 2101 we start with one of the biggest issues that the global community faces today – inequality. More generally, we first start with the empirical focus on the current state of global economy and move on to how the latest economic theory helps us understand it as is, and, hopefully, make it better.

Technical Communication and Environmental Justice

Even as the proliferation of new media platforms has made it possible for activists and community organizations to publicize the causes and consequences of climate change to a broader audience than ever before, the overlap of environmental degradation and racism remains underrepresented.

Transportation and Health

In this course, we will focus on the relationship between human health outcomes and the transportation system including operations, construction and maintenance. The health outcomes that we will consider will focus on the air quality impacts for both users and the general population, including sensitive populations, as well as occupational exposure (e.g. truck and transit drivers, maintenance workers dock workers, etc.) for those directly employed in transportation.

Chemical Engineering of Energy Systems

The course addresses the engineering of energy systems from a process engineering perspective and therefore requires energy equity literacy and design solution skills.  Energy is one of the key drivers of social and economic development.  The inequitable access of communities across the globe to energy is reflected in their relative well being.  Showing how to develop designs of systems as different scales and with different technological mixes is a key sustainability enabler.

Policy, Trends, and Ethics in Real Estate Development

The course will focus on the application of market, community, and regulatory factors into successful housing design and construction. The class will explore decisions that will occur day to day associated with the pendulum swing from profitability to safety and sustainability. 

The course is partnered with  local nonprofits to provide opportunities for experiential learning. Partnerships will show how thoughtful development can produce meaningful community results, a sustainable product, and increased profitability.

Work, Equity, and Wellness

In this course, students learn about and reflect on the historical and present-day intersections of work, racial equity, and wellness. Weekly class discussions are supported by readings, podcasts, and documentaries. Guided by the philosophy of scholars such as Audre Lorde and bell hooks – to heal self on the path to healing society- students will be invited to connect to course content by reflecting on how it resonates with personal and organizational experiences.

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