Kendeda Building

Principles of Macroeconomics

The core objective of the Principles of Macroeconomics course is to familiarize students with how policy makers at the Federal level are thinking about the national economy, its health, the inevitable booms and busts, and what needs to be done to mediate the volatility of business cycle fluctuations.

Educational Applications of New Media

This course asks how selected educational theories can inform tangible media design to support informed action on environmental challenges. We will ask how to use such approaches to support creativity, engagement, and education on issues such as pollution, waste, and recycling. The goal is to combine physical computing and material design as applied educational technologies to educate and activate response to specific environmental challenges. We will focus on challenges on the Georgia Tech campus and problems we face every day as students or staff.

Project Studio

What new cultures of computing are needed for the Anthropocene? How can we re-design the invention, consumption, and use of computing amid climate change? What are responsible futures of computing in times of environmental upheaval? In this project studio course, we will draw on methods and theories from design, art, the humanities and social sciences to critically re-imagine computing in the Anthropocene.

Design + Research Studio

Key to the course is the incorporation of high performance active and passive energy systems into very well-conceived and executed building and site design propositions. The key metric for the studio is “prove it.” The studio is structured around the topics of Component Development and Transformation, Body, Enclosure and Site Ideation, and Building Type and Systems Development / Customization.

Earth Processes

NOTE: The Summer 2020 course will be offered online only.

Clinical Observation Design Experience

Clinical Observation Design Experience provides students with an opportunity to identify and solve problems in active area emergency departments. In this course students will spend approximately eight hours per week in area emergency departments including those at Emory Healthcare sites and at Grady Memorial Hospital. Students will learn and practice observation and interviewing skills and dive into relevant medical literature to develop a deep understanding of problems they discover.

Sustainable Urban Development

This course introduces the challenges of sustainability as applied to the built environment and the built environment's interconnectivity with the natural environment.  It addresses a range of specific sustainability-related issues such as sprawl and smart growth, climate change, motorized and non-motorized transportation, social equity and environmental justice, green architecture, food systems, and community engagement.  Students will do substantial background reading, engage in class discussion, and apply their skills to a small-group, real-world project.

Sustainable Urban Development

This course introduces the challenges of sustainability as applied to the built environment and the built environment's interconnectivity with the natural environment.  It addresses a range of specific sustainability-related issues such as sprawl and smart growth, climate change, motorized and non-motorized transportation, social equity and environmental justice, green architecture, food systems, and community engagement.  Students will do substantial background reading, engage in class discussion, and apply their skills to a small-group, real-world project.

Sovereignty, Energy, and Settler-Colonialism

The wealth of the United States is premised upon many things: hard work, inventiveness, an entrepreneurial spirit, and so on, but its first premise is land. Land that had been tended and kept by Native Americans. Land that was taken, stolen, or bought over the course of American expansion west. These lands offered new sources of biomass, fossil fuels, and even uranium to exploit. The American energy system benefited from these abundant fuels (in addition to the labor of enslaved Blacks).

Real Estate and Financial Development

The purpose of this course is to enable students to understand the role finance plays in community development. This means understanding the “big picture” and the more detailed mechanics of real estate financial markets, including the roles of developers, investors, lenders, tenants, owners, and the public sector. We will learn financial analysis, how to create and analyze a pro forma, about the development process, but within a framework that addresses broader issues promoting sustainable and inclusive development.

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