Affiliated Courses

Tech and Environment

This course examines global environmental history from prehistory to the present.

Introduction to Global Development

This course introduces students to the history, theory and practice of international development. Students will examine the different meanings and objectives of global development, paying particular attention to economic growth, poverty alleviation, inequality reduction, capability enhancement, the defense of human rights and sustainability.

Writing, Reading, and Resilience

I am in conversation with CARE/Counseling Center to devise materials that could extend these tools beyond the classroom and into the broader Georgia Tech student community. In addition, I intend reach out to a new community partner to explore how we might address the inequalities of mental health and self-care for people of color. I would like to invite the Atlanta-based art-activist group “The Nap Ministry” to give a workshop to the class.

Principles of Macroeconomics

Today is the perfect time to learn about macroeconomics! Current media discussions are exceptionally pointed and centered on many macro-economic policy issues. They range from various paths of economic recovery from the negative impacts of COVID, taxation and inequities, costs vs. benefits of environmental protection, trade wars, technology-driven job destruction vs. creation, welfare debates and the list goes on.

Educational Applications of New Media

This course asks how selected educational theories can inform tangible media design to support informed action on environmental challenges. We will ask how to use such approaches to support creativity, engagement, and education on issues such as pollution, waste, and recycling. The goal is to combine physical computing and material design as applied educational technologies to educate and activate response to specific environmental challenges. We will focus on challenges on the Georgia Tech campus and problems we face every day as students or staff.

Storytelling and Social Change: Russian Literature, Film, and Ethnography

This course investigates the form and contexts of Russian prose, film, and documentary storytelling that challenges norms and seeks social change. Authors will include Tolstoy, Chekhov, Zoshchenko, Tokareva, and Ulitskaya among others. We will also work with Soviet and contemporary films, and ethnographic media, considering through these various forms why storytelling endures as a medium for transforming people and environments.

Project Studio

What new cultures of computing are needed for the Anthropocene? How can we re-design the invention, consumption, and use of computing amid climate change? What are responsible futures of computing in times of environmental upheaval? In this project studio course, we will draw on methods and theories from design, art, the humanities and social sciences to critically re-imagine computing in the Anthropocene.

Architecture & Ecology

In our time of climate change, this course brings together people and discourses from many disciplines in pursuit of more resilient social-ecological systems within our built environments through dialogue, interdisciplinary research, design, and action. The course provides introductions to design research methodologies, critical theories and practices of ecological science and thinking, and those of sustainability through readings and dialogue with distinguished researchers working in these areas.

Design + Research Studio

Key to the course is the incorporation of high performance active and passive energy systems into very well-conceived and executed building and site design propositions. The key metric for the studio is “prove it.” The studio is structured around the topics of Component Development and Transformation, Body, Enclosure and Site Ideation, and Building Type and Systems Development / Customization.

Earth Processes

NOTE: The Summer 2020 course will be offered online only.

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