Affiliated Courses

Social Issues and Public Policy

This course focuses on social issues associated with American society, as well as public policy used to address these issues, by taking a critical sociological perspective in analyzing U.S. culture and capitalism and its impact on our social institutions, social inequalities, and the quality of our democracy. We focus on comparisons of the U.S. with other affluent, market-based countries in order to understand the uniqueness of American society.

Introduction to Urban and Regional Planning

This course provides an overview of the planning of cities and metropolitan regions.  The legal and historical context as well as substantive areas or urban planning are addressed. Tensions among economic, environmental, and equity results of public policies and private developments are examined.  Tools for involving stakeholders in planning decisions are surveyed.

Climate and Global Change

Climate change is among the greatest challenges facing humanity today. The course breaks down the scientific underpinnings of how increasing atmospheric greenhouse gases affect the global climate. By looking at the problem of climate change from multiple angles, students get a decent view of how a modern climate scientist works. The course also addresses the impacts of climate change and discusses the pros and cons of potential solutions.

Data Science in Conservation

Conservation approaches have now entered the age of databases, remotely sensed data, computational modeling, and datasets based on long term monitoring. The culmination of these rich data sources is a series of fascinating papers that mine these data to address compelling, big-picture questions about how species, communities, and ecosystems respond to environmental and anthropogenic changes. These studies provide the resources to guide conservation decisions and policies with insight and deliberation.

Special Topics: Community Organizing

Community organizing and mobilization have long been recognized as key to the impact of social movements on society. In a democratic society, an “organized” citizenry is better able to develop, articulate, and assert its shared interests in order to advance equity, accountability, and effectiveness in social institutions. As such, community organizing is an important element of creating sustainable communities.

Life Cycle Assessment

Life Cycle Assessment, ISYE 8813 teaches the methods of evaluating life cycle environmental, economic, and social impacts of products and services. Open to graduate students of all majors, this course includes work on an individual life cycle assessment matched to your interests and graduate program. Previous projects have included the life cycle impacts of clothing, the impacts of a large local Georgia coal plant, comparison of transportation technologies including electric vehicles, using solar energy for fertilizer production in India, and electricity in sub-Saharan Africa.

This is Fine - Humor, Media, and Climate Change

Recent IPCC predictions argue that the world has ten years to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by half. Ten years to take a range of overlapping and dependent cultural, economic, and technological systems and reduce their carbon footprint by half. And only about thirty years to make these systems carbon neutral. The world Tech students will enter after ‘getting out’ will be dramatically warmer and more unstable that the one their parents and grandparents entered.

The Poetics of Sustainability: Race and the Environment

Utilizing our WOVEN curriculum, this Serve-Learn-Sustain affiliated course will explore the intersections of race, immigration, and the environment as urgent social, political, and ecological issues through the lens of poetry.

Back to the Future

The cumulative consequences of the Anthropocene—warming, carbon emission, species loss, deforestation, melting, ocean acidification, and the global waste crisis—make the future of life on earth difficult to imagine. Throughout most of human history, we have relied on models such as generational inheritance or market growth to figure what lies ahead, but if the last few years are any indication, the rhetoric we use to project the future is increasingly insufficient.

Ecology

Ecology is a flipped course where students work on applied problems, including those associated with climate change, invasive species, overexploitation etc. The focus is on the ecological concepts, looking at either sustainability or community, with reference to the other, through units, labs, assignments, and activities. 

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