Affiliated Courses

Culture & Society: Cultural Wars & War Culture

This course is an exploration of questions and themes in cultural sociology with a focus on the Middle East. The course is fully remote with one synchronous session each week. It fulfills non-U.S. requirement for HTS majors. Students will have the opportunity to collaborate with different initiatives and work on projects focused on social and cultural sustainability on campus. Assignments will allow students to create cultural products in their medium of choice such as short videos, info graphs, paper, websites, or podcasts to give voice to peacemaking efforts.

Black in America

In this course, we will consider how different forms of communication--from novels to film and poetry to comics--represent and reflect upon the history of black experience in America. We will be processing, discussing, and debating some of the key issues behind the Black Lives Matter movement, as well as responding creatively to topics such as police and prison reform, reparations, black representation in media, appropriation of black culture, and medical ethics related to race.

Gaming Climate Change

Climate change, the foremost crisis of the 21st century, presents manifold challenges to human cognition, organization, and action. Only recently, though, has modern media has started to grapple with climate change in books, television shows, and movies. Games, both analog and digital, though lag behind (as a quick Internet search for ‘climate change games’ reveals). This course will explore the question of whether games are a capable rhetorical medium for understanding or affecting climate change? Can they help articulate the scale and inequitable effects of climate change?

Science, Art, and Justice

Everything is political, from science to art. In an era of climate change, protests for racial justice, and rising inequality, it is more important than ever to understand the relationship between science and art in effecting public opinion. This course will explore, briefly, the relationship between science and art in a few moments of modern human history—slavery, colonialization, industrialization, the development of fossil fuels, the development of nuclear power, and climate change.

#BirdComm

Social media has changed the ways we communicate about science (#SciComm), and this is especially true of the citizen scientists, ornithologists, and plain old enthusiasts who log on to talk about birds. In this remote asynchronous course, we will consider not only contemporary #BirdComm but also how these conversations have changed over the past 150 years.

Equity, Justice, and Economic Development

The course is focused on the topic of social and spatial justice and equity planning. The course explores the inequalities in our planning theory and practice. The course highlights and engages in the key debates in the realm of planning and urban policy. We collectively study the problems of equity and justice in various substantive topics including education, job training, housing and criminal justice system. It encourages thinking of approaches to difficult issues.

Supply Chain Economics

This course applies economic and supply chain principles to products and service supply chains to serve human needs. Up to 40% of the course is a project.

The Building Blocks of ABCD - SHORT COURSE

This short course focuses on the origins, successes, and uses of Asset-Based Community Development (ABCD).

Climate Policy

This course aims to address the whole complexity of climate change, by bringing together the science of climate change, the analysis of impacts, and the economic and engineering strategies to reduce emissions.  In this class, students will be actively engaged in exploring the scientific and economic issues underlying the threat of global climate change and the institutions engaged in negotiating an international response.

Modern Iran: Tehran on Screen

The course Modern Iran: Tehran on Screen is an exploration of modern Iran through cinematic representations of its capital city, Tehran and has the following four goals. First, it trains students to become participants in debates about the Iranian Cinema, mediated representations of Tehran, as well as Iranian arts, urban culture and society. In doing so, it introduces students to dominant paradigms of cinematic arts, urban social development and welfare, and situates such paradigms in the contemporary history of Iran.

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