Affiliated Courses

Construction Management and Megaprojects

Sustainable Development of Construction Megaprojects Through Community Engagement: Social, Environmental, and Economic Impacts of Megaprojects - Tools, such as life cycle assessment (LCA), were be introduced to the students to study the human ecology of big projects. Megaprojects were analyzed as displacements that follow a socio-natural process. Students learned the methodology to study changes in the surrounding environments of megaprojects from social, environmental, and economic standpoints.

Urban Algae-fueled Aquaponics: The Food, Energy, Water Nexus in Atlanta

The goal of the research is to determine how to make urban aquaponics netzero in terms of water, energy and materials such that it is affordable to the masses.  Once we get our prototype under construction, we will research clever ways to improve the efficiency of the system by using waste urban water, nutrient and heat resources as well as high-tech additions such as photovoltaics, sensors, and algae photobioreactors.  We plan to work with and empower the community to grow their own food and to improve food system resiliency. 

Multimodal Transportation

Planning, design and operation of systems of air, rail, water and highway facilities, including those for bicycles and pedestrians. In this course, we will focus on the need, purpose and design for multimodality.  Why is a multimodal transportation system important?  How do we plan and design for multimodal transportation?  How do we measure the performance of a multimodal transportation system?  What is a complete street and what guides are available for complete streets design?

Environmental Technology in the Developing World

CEE 4350 seeks to develop practical skills to evaluate environmental technologies in developing countries with a focus on sustainable and healthy communities. The global burden of disease is known to be dominated by a variety of environmental risk factors that include poor air quality (both indoors and outdoors), water borne diseases, and issues related to sanitation; potential solutions involve the application of promising technologies.

Capstone Design

Capstone Design is an interdisciplinary civil and environmental design experience.  Students form teams of 3 – 5 people, and these teams function as “companies” that provide consulting services to a selected sponsor on a specific design project. Students begin the semester responding to an actual Request for Qualifications (RFQ) advertised from a local project sponsor as a team.  Students then select their projects among many different sub-disciplines and themes in order based on their ranking on the RFQ response.

Honors Ecology

Honors ecology is a team based, problem based course in general ecology. There are no lectures: students are expected to identify the relevant knowledge, learn and apply it to the given problem and are mentored by faculty through this process.  Student teams examine five ecological problems ranging from single species conservation/management to watershed health assessment. Several of these projects (changes in biological communities through time, watershed health) are focused on local communities.

Honors Organismal Biology

The laboratory portions of these courses are designed as research service-learning labs that integrate relevant community service with academic coursework to enhance learning, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities.  In partnership with the Piedmont Park Conservancy, students conduct research that benefits learning in biology and the greater Atlanta community.

Honors Biological Principles

The laboratory portions of these courses are designed as research service-learning labs that integrate relevant community service with academic coursework to enhance learning, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities.  In partnership with the Atlanta Botanical Gardens, students conduct research that benefits learning in biology and the greater Atlanta community.

Green Infrastructure: EPA Campus Rainwater Challenge

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Campus Rainwater Challenge, a national student design competition, is focused on creating green infrastructure and building sustainable communities on college campuses and across America.  The first half of the course will include tutorial seminars on stormwater management, green infrastructure, and understanding the social, economic and ecological relationships among Georgia Tech, the Emerald Corridor along Proctor Creek, the Westside Alliance neighborhoods and the Chattahoochee River.

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