Affiliated Courses

Sustainability in American Literary Regionalism

In this section of English 1102, students will read and analyze novels, short stories, and movies grouped together under the genre of American literary regionalism. These texts, created between 1880 and 1950, are concerned with American small towns and rural areas, agriculture and farming science, and community health and development. We will investigate how an earlier generation of writers represented concepts of sustainability and equitability, and how these representations compare to modern-day writing on the same topics.

Policy, Trends, and Ethics in Real Estate Development

Through experiential learning, students of this course will understand sustainability in the built environment and within a community. They will witness the connection between service and profitability as related to property management that helps eliminate transiency which has proven to be a primary contributor to failing public schools. Teams within the class will be assigned real world deliverable that will assist with the mission of the partnered nonprofit.

Sea Level Rise and Coastal Engineering

This course will cover a survey of the modern science of sea level rise and engineering adaptation to ongoing sea level rise. In the first half of the course, students will learn about the Earth system processes which drive sea level rise in Earth’s past and in recent years, and how these processes may change in the future. Students will do a data-driven project exploring historical records of sea level change and variability at individual locations, including a deep dive into the local factors which have driven changes in local sea level.

Government and Housing Markets

Why are we in an affordable housing crisis? What can city planners do to help households at various income levels obtain safe, affordable housing? How can city planners take housing markets into account when planning for transportation, sustainability, and equity to avoid unanticipated consequences? In this class, we will learn the fundamental concepts of housing markets and housing policy.

Urban Transportation

This course is an introduction to urban passenger transportation policy and planning in the US with a sustainability focus. It is structured around three components: (1) History, theory, and problem definition, (2) The planning process, and (3) Solutions and analytical techniques. The course will help to understand the planning process comprehensively along with its multiple dimensions, how our current transportation systems has evolved over time, what is a sustainable system, policies and planning approaches that help is to achieve it, and challenges related to planning.

Policy Tools for Environmental Management

Given its wide impact on community well-being and the economy, it should be no surprise that U.S. environmental policy engenders controversy. This is particularly apparent since the 2016 elections. Many questions arise. Have environmental laws worked effectively to improve the quality of the environment? How can society best establish environmental policies and management systems when faced with scientific uncertainties and significant economic costs? What is the role and effectiveness of command-and-control regulation?

Race, Medicine, and Science

The primary objective of this course is to study the interrelationship of race, medicine, and science drawing on various literatures such as history, sociology, and anthropology. The course rigorously examines the social, political, and cultural concept of race and its usefulness as an analytical category with a emphasis on American history.

Environmental Justice in Global Literature and Media

Students in this course learn about how communities in diverse parts of the world are meeting the challenges posed by unsustainable development and environmental degradation.

Fundamentals of GIS

Fundmentals of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a course designed to introduce students to the powerful world of geospatial information and technologies. Almost everything we do in life has a spatial element and this course will provide students with the necessary knowledge and skills to utilize GIS in any discipline of their choosing. In this course, students will learn how to make digital, interactive maps and applications that can be used to help communities make informed decisions based in science.

Imagining the City

In this first year writing and communication course you will consider how your work at Tech and after Tech may interact with and affect urban communities and the people who live in them. We will begin by examining our own backgrounds--whether you're a life long city dweller or whether you grew up in a rural or suburban area--and how they have shaped our attitudes toward Atlanta and toward cities generally. These backgrounds, we will see, may condition our attitudes toward the development of urban space.

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