Affiliated Courses

Real Estate and Financial Development

The purpose of this course is to enable students to understand the role finance plays in community development. This means understanding the “big picture” and the more detailed mechanics of real estate financial markets, including the roles of developers, investors, lenders, tenants, owners, and the public sector. We will learn financial analysis, how to create and analyze a pro forma, about the development process, but within a framework that addresses broader issues promoting sustainable and inclusive development.

Built Environment and Public Health

This interdisciplinary course, examines how cities and neighborhoods can have both positive and adverse effects on human health, and produces recommendations to improve these outcomes. This SEMINAR is an elective planning and public health course that explores the interconnections between these fields and equips students with skills and experiences to plan healthy, sustainable communities. This course covers planning and public health foundations, natural and built environments, vulnerable populations and health equity, and health policy and global impacts.

Atlanta in the 1960s

This course will utilize the materials collected in the Ivan Allen Digital Archive to explore the history of Atlanta in the 1960s through the lens of Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.’s administration (1962-70).

Art/Work in Atlanta

If you feel like you sometimes see the world differently than your friends, family, and classmates, you might just be a documentary filmmaker. This course gives you a framework for trying to put your vision on film. It won't be as hard as you think--it will actually be a lot of fun. The materials for your film are all around you--the people and place of Atlanta provide us with exciting stories, a passionate cast of characters, and beautiful scenes for our film.

Technical Communication: Make it Sustainable

The poet Ezra Pound’s famous declaration to “Make It New!” has served as a motto for much of twentieth-century life, a battle cry across the arts and sciences to continually innovate, tinker, and push boundaries. As we press deeper into the twenty-first century, our section of Technical Communication will fuse the dynamic spirit of Pound’s modernism with one of the most important cultural and economic concerns of the present era—sustainability.

Biological Principles

This active learning course is designed to have students work on applied problems, including those associated with climate change and human health, by applying the fundamentals of biology. The course has historically engaged in partnerships with Atlanta biologists, most notably those at Atlanta Audubon to monitor the public health and ecological implications of bird strikes in Atlanta. Note: this lecture course has a co-requisite, previously affiliated service-learning lab.

Public Health Analytics

The socioecological model of public health clearly establishes the importance of physical and social environments in building healthy, sustainable communities and influencing population health. This scientific paradigm is firmly embedded in the idea that the health status of an individual is simultaneously produced by individual biology and their surrounding physical, social, cultural and political context.

Intro to Research

This course was created to give students the tools and skills necessary to participate in research as an integral component in their undergraduate experience. This course will explore research ethics (satisfying the research ethics requirements for funding through the NSF, NIH or PURA awards), scientific literacy (finding, reading, and writing research papers), and research careers. The course makes frequent use of case studies and discussions and considers the impact of research and industry on communities.

Economics of the Environment

Is economic growth incompatible with environmental quality? This course discusses how human social and economic behavior impacts and is impacted by the environment. We discuss how to design policies that promote economically and environmentally sustainable communities such as carbon pricing and property-rights approaches. In addition, we discuss how communities can manage environmental commons problems by relying on local knowledge, norms, and institutions.

Business Communication

LMC 3403 Bussiness Communication is a course dedicated to finding innovative and synergistic approaches to the community through a multiplicity of communicative practices. The class is part of the WOVEN (Written, Oral, Visual, Electronic and Nonverbal) emphasis at Georgia Tech, something that the class aims varying means. The course centers around start-up culture and entrepreneurship in community art and design. Currently, there are a group of students who are linked to the CS Junior Design class.

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