Affiliated Courses

Clinical Observation Design Experience

Clinical Observation Design Experience provides students with an opportunity to identify and solve problems in active area emergency departments. In this course students will spend approximately eight hours per week in area emergency departments including those at Emory Healthcare sites and at Grady Memorial Hospital. Students will learn and practice observation and interviewing skills and dive into relevant medical literature to develop a deep understanding of problems they discover.

Bioethics

Students will not only learn about the ethical dilemmas in our community, but develop measures and actions to alleviate such. They could make a lasting impact on the community and learn the values of life long service.

Sustainable Urban Development

This course introduces the challenges of sustainability as applied to the built environment and the built environment's interconnectivity with the natural environment.  It addresses a range of specific sustainability-related issues such as sprawl and smart growth, climate change, motorized and non-motorized transportation, social equity and environmental justice, green architecture, food systems, and community engagement.  Students will do substantial background reading, engage in class discussion, and apply their skills to a small-group, real-world project.

Construction Management

BC6025 Construction Management is a required course for all Building Construction master students in the Program management and construction management track, and also one of the required electives for students in the facility management track. It is an introductory course on construction management principles for building construction projects. Though called "construction management", this class introduces the life cycle of a building project: Elements of planning and financing; Project delivery methods; Managing construction resource, and facility management, etc.

Vertically Integrated Project: 21st Century Global Atlanta

This VIP course brings together students of diverse backgrounds and disciplines to tell the story of Atlanta as a global city, and to increase access to global citizenship at Georgia Tech and nationally. We document and connect with the individuals and communities that are transforming Atlanta into a global metropolis, such as heritage and immigrant communities, foreign-born residents in a variety of professional fields, and thought leaders engaged in the global community.

Vertically Integrated Project: Living Building Science

You don't have to be Matt Damon on Mars to realize that now is the time to science the sh** out of this planet. In order for the almost 8 billion on earth to lead comfortable lives without ruining the Earth forever, we are going to have to start living sustainably. Georgia Tech just opened the Kendeda building, which seeks to satisfy the Living Building Challenge which includes being net energy positive, net water positive, and zero waste. What is the impact of this building on the external environment? What is the quality of the air and water inside the building?

The Shape of the City: Gentrification and Culture in Atlanta and America

Gentrification—the economic and cultural “revitalization” of American cities--has been, for better or worse, the defining feature of urban life in the twentyfirst century. As late as the 1990s, the “inner city” was often portrayed in journalism and popular culture as a decaying, crime-ridden ghetto; now it is often seen as a booming, culturally vibrant, economically desirable playground for hipsters and creatives—at least those who can afford it. How did this happen? Is it good or bad? Can gentrification go on forever?

Sustainable Urban Development

This course introduces the challenges of sustainability as applied to the built environment and the built environment's interconnectivity with the natural environment.  It addresses a range of specific sustainability-related issues such as sprawl and smart growth, climate change, motorized and non-motorized transportation, social equity and environmental justice, green architecture, food systems, and community engagement.  Students will do substantial background reading, engage in class discussion, and apply their skills to a small-group, real-world project.

Ecology

Ecology is a flipped course where students work on applied problems, including those associated with climate change, invasive species, overexploitation etc. The focus is on the ecological concepts, looking at either sustainability or community, with reference to the other, through units, labs, assignments, and activities. 

Sovereignty, Energy, and Settler-Colonialism

The wealth of the United States is premised upon many things: hard work, inventiveness, an entrepreneurial spirit, and so on, but its first premise is land. Land that had been tended and kept by Native Americans. Land that was taken, stolen, or bought over the course of American expansion west. These lands offered new sources of biomass, fossil fuels, and even uranium to exploit. The American energy system benefited from these abundant fuels (in addition to the labor of enslaved Blacks).

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