Undergraduate

Introduction to Environmental Science

Understanding our planet’s environment requires understanding how the whole Earth functions as an interconnected system. This course investigates the four components of the Earth system in detail: the atmosphere, the oceans, the solid Earth, and the biosphere to understand how these processes interact, and then how we, as humans, impact our planet.

Habitable Planet

The search for life beyond the Earth is reaching new heights. So what are we looking for, and how will we know when we find it? This course will explore the history of the solar system and the Earth as the one example of a habitable planet—one that can support living organisms—that we know now. We will consider how the planets formed, the important planetary processes that brought about the Earth as it was when life arose and the planet we live on today.

Vertically Integrated Project: Configurable Computing and Embedded Systems

This course is part of the Vertically Integrated Projects program, a program where students get credit for working on ongoing projects over multiple semesters. This VIP course explores how embedded sensor and computing technology can be used to promote sustainability in a smart city framework.  The goal is to allow citizens to assess and monitor environmental conditions so that they are empowered to make wise decisions, effect change, and foster healthier, nurturing communities.

Environmental Engineering Senior Design

Capstone Design-Environmental Section is an interdisciplinary environmental design experience. The course is offered in parallel with the civil engineering section of the course; CEE students may form teams with mixed CE and EnvE composition; and teams from each program may perform projects in either section. Students form teams of 3 – 5 people, and these teams function as “companies” that provide engineering services under guidance of a sponsor on design project that the team selects.

Technology and Sustainable Community Development (Tech and Sustainable Communities)

When does technology improve communities? When doesn’t it, and why? How can you improve your chance of having a positive long-term impact on communities? How is designing technology for communities different from designing technology for consumers?  This course will explore the role of technology in the development of sustainable communities, locally and internationally.

Introduction to Sustainable Systems

This course has a GT designation so student in any major can count it towards free electives, and it is additionally cross-listed with Management and Industrial & Systems Engineering.  You can register for any one of the course numbers and you'll be in the same class!

Sustainability, Technology, and Policy

NOTE: Summer sections are generally only offered as part of the study abroad program, Sustainable Development and Climate Change: A Multidisciplinary Program in Italy  However, Summer 2020 will be offered online and open to any student.

Introduction to Engineering Graphics

Learn graphics and CAD tools through project-based learning with Motivational Designs for Food, Water, and Energy Sustainability  

International Energy Markets

Energy is the backbone of industrial economies. However, energy production and consumption has extensive social costs associated with it, from the emission of carbon dioxide and other airborne pollutants to national security implications due to the uneven distribution of fossil fuel resources around the globe. Balancing the benefits and costs of energy use today over a long time horizon is one of most important challenges facing the world today. This course is designed to give you an understanding of how primary energy and electricity markets operate.

Vertically Integrated Project: Bee Snap

This course is part of the Vertically Integrated Projects program, where students get credit for working on ongoing projects over multiple semesters.  As part of the Bee-SNAP team, students will design devices and computational approaches to study bees in urban habitats.  Predictions and models developed using these approaches will be validated with biological field studies.  Bees are important pollinators and efficient pollination is critical to our food supply.  Should bees become threatened in urban areas, food security could be at risk. 

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