Undergraduate

Honors Biological Principles

The laboratory portions of the BIOL 1511 and 1521 courses are designed as research service-learning labs that integrate relevant community service with academic coursework to enhance learning, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities. In partnership with the Atlanta Botanical Gardens (BIOL 1511) and the Piedmont Park Conservancy (BIOL 1521), students conduct research that benefits learning in biology and the greater Atlanta community.

Foundations of Sustainable Systems

How can we accelerate progress towards a more sustainable world? How do we create sustainable systems for the 21st century? This course discusses how to employ a systems framework to advance sustainability at multiple scales, including a community, a region, a supply chain, a company, or an entire nation. The course considers sustainability from its theoretical foundations to its modern-day practice, incorporating environmental, economic, and social dimensions.

Sustainable Business Consulting Practicum

Sustainability from a business perspective encompasses environmental and social performance that collectively drives significant corporate value.  Increasingly, the manner in which companies interact with communities (whether on environmental or social issues) determines the success or failure of company activities.  In this course, the consulting projects frequently involve important elements of community engagement as themes and potential areas of student recommendations.

Technology and Poverty

This course encourages students to think about how they might design technologies with a focus on global development, paying special attention to the needs of underserved, under-resourced, and under-represented communities across the world.

Technical Communication: Water, Water Everywhere

Students will be learning about effectively engaging with information using strategies and practices that allow them to successfully communicate with a variety of stakeholders. Students will learn rhetorical strategies, develop competencies in analysis and citation, and engage in reflection. Students will also be extending problem-solving skills as they work on a range of assignments designed to help expose them to workplace genres. These genres enable students to think more about individual and collaborative strategies.

GT 1000 IE

Take first-years to Atlanta Community Food Bank, do some volunteer work. We will guide them to link the operations to Industrial Engineering principles and its impact to community and sustainability. This can plant a seed to grow as they grow in Georgia Tech. 

Ecology Lab

Ecology Lab covers basic ecological phenomenon using urban ecological settings as the backdrop. As a class, we visit areas in the metro-Atlanta community to understand human-environment interactions within our ecosystem. We immerse ourselves in these communities to understand the short- and long-term consequences of environmental change and what ecologically can be done to keep ecosystems-- and related neighborhoods-- thriving.

Chemical Principles II

This Honors Program section of Chemical Principles II differs from traditional large lectures in two key areas: First, core chemical concepts are introduced by considering "big questions" in chemistry, typically pertaining to the challenge of powering the planet with clean energy. For instance, how do catalytic converters mitigating transportation emissions, and what are the impacts on pricing and availability of precious metals?

Capstone Design

Cities and communities in the U.S. and around the world are entering a new era of transformational change, in which their inhabitants and the surrounding built and natural environments are increasingly connected by smart technologies, leading to new opportunities for innovation, improved services, and enhanced quality of life.

Environmental Measures

Prior to 2008, most of the world’s population lived in rural areas. Since then, and perhaps for the rest of human history, cities will be the dominant form of human habitation on this planet. It is therefore imperative that urban places are healthful and desirable. But how does one know if a city is healthy? What are the “vital signs” that indicate that everything is okay? These manufactured environments require enormous energy and material resources and create tremendous quantities and concentrations of wastes. Are they sustainable?

Pages

Subscribe to Undergraduate