Undergraduate

Introduction to Historic Preservation

This course will help students develop an understanding of the history, philosophy, organization, current legislation, policies, and practices of historic preservation in the United States. The course is designed to give students an overview of the field and its relationship with other built environment professions, such as architecture, construction, planning, engineering, and landscape architecture and the critical role historic preservation plays in creating sustainable communities. Service projects give students real-life experience in historic preservation.

Smart and Sustainable Cities

This course is open to all undergraduate Civil and Environmental engineering majors. It will be taught in three parts. In Part I, the course will focus on providing a broad overview of how cities function by examining the various urban systems (e.g., transportation infrastructure, power supply, water distribution, buildings, etc.) and their interdependencies in relation to each other and to human and natural systems. This will be explored in the context of the role urban systems play in understanding and achieving urban sustainability.

Introduction to Organizational Behavior

MGT 3101 Organizational Behavior is a field that seeks to understand, explain and ultimately improve organizational behavior in organizations. This survey course informs students on fields such as motivation, performance, teams, pro-social behavior, diversity, servant leadership, and ethics in organizations in order to create leadership skills required for creating sustainable, community-oriented organizations.

Making the List: Banned Books, Best Sellers, and Best Of

What makes a book a success? In this writing course, we will examine three measures of book quality: literary prizes, bestseller lists, and the banned book list. The course will include projects that enhance written, oral, visual, electronic and nonverbal (WOVEN) communication skills while honing students’ ability to think and talk critically about literature, culture, and consumer habits within a wide variety of reading communities and other audiences.

Urban Transportation

This course is an introduction to urban passenger transportation policy and planning in the US with a sustainability focus. The course is structured around three components on which we will spend approximately five weeks each: 1) History, theory, and problem definition 2) The planning process, and 3) Solutions. Throughout the semester we will come to understand how our current transportation systems came to be, what a sustainable system would look like, policies and planning approaches that will help us to achieve it, and challenges we’re likely to face.

Green Construction

The course focuses on strategies and technologies to improve the energy efficiency and performance of buildings, and to reduce the environmental impact of buildings. The course emphasizes technical aspects of building design, materials selection, construction processes, and building operations. The use of objective criteria for assessing building “green-ness”, from meta issues such as building location and site – to operational details such as the selection of cleaning chemicals, is stressed throughout the course.

GT 2000

Transfer students will start their Georgia Tech experience on the right foot with this GT 2000 seminar which covers topics critical to a transfer student’s success. And, through activities and field trips you will also learn the fundamentals of how to shape and be part of a sustainable community. 

Class, Power, and Inequality

In Class, Power, and Inequality, students will explore the causes and consequences of economic inequality in the United States and abroad. In particular, this course will help students understand why inequality between individuals and communities occurs, with major focuses on changes in the economy and social forces like politics, culture, and religion. Further, we pay particular attention to how gender and race/ethnicity shape economic inequality.

Healthcare Design of the Future

This active multidisciplinary class provides and introduction to healthcare and healthcare design, focusing on how to identify and evaluate opportunities for innovation; how to set up and analyze field studies; how to conduct multidisciplinary human-centered design projects, and how to express results in written and graphic form, including mock-ups.  Multidisciplinary teams work with healthcare partners such as Children's Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory Healthcare, to develop solutions to empower patients and families, and make healthcare safer and more effective.

Pages

Subscribe to Undergraduate