Undergraduate

Sustainable Urban Development

This course introduces the challenges of sustainability as applied to the built environment and the built environment's interconnectivity with the natural environment.  It addresses a range of specific sustainability-related issues such as sprawl and smart growth, climate change, motorized and non-motorized transportation, social equity and environmental justice, green architecture, food systems, and community engagement.  Students will do substantial background reading, engage in class discussion, and apply their skills to a small-group, real-world project.  CP

Environmentalism and Ecocriticism

How have contemporary media, such as film, literature, architecture, photography, and computation, been used to shape popular conceptions of the environment, to challenge these conceptions and to propose radical alternatives? In this class, students will learn to analyze representations of the earth, nature, wildlife and wilderness in creative work across domains: a landscape by James Corner, a short story by Ursula K. La Guin, an installation by Natalie Jeremijenko, a film by Hayao Miyazaki, an interactive narrative by Jeremy Mendez and Leanne Allison.

Introduction to Global Development

This course introduces students to the history, theory and practice of international development. Students will examine the different meanings and objectives of global development, paying particular attention to economic growth, poverty alleviation, inequality reduction, capability enhancement, the defense of human rights and sustainability.

The History and Rhetoric of Science Writing for Children

Books for children, both fiction and non-fiction, can address scientific principles in creative ways in an attempt to educate, inform and excite young children. Hidden inside many classic children’s texts are broad scientific concepts like climate change (Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs), engineering (The Three Little Pigs), life cycles (The Very Hungry Caterpillar), and environmentalism (The Lorax).

Biodiversity Dynamics

Biodiversity Dynamics will be a project-based course will explore where plants and animals live on the landscape, and how and why they move or evolve in response to environmental changes and human impacts. We will use real species, landscape, climate, and human impact data to explore biogeographic rules, such as the latitudinal & elevation diversity gradients. We will also learn about how landscape ecologists use species distribution models and corridor models for conservation purposes.

Sustainable Community Service: Protecting Urban Ecology

This course will introduce students to methods for effective community service in the Atlanta area, specifically related to urban ecology.  We will investigate the complex balancing of perceived human needs with those of the natural environment.  The course will focus on the benefits to humans of greenspace and how to protect and nurture it.  We will learn by interacting with guest speakers from urban ecology networks and by participation in off-campus, hands-on activities.

Energy Efficiency and Environmental Impacts

The course introduces global and local environmental issues from air transportation activities. With rapidly increasing air travel demand, environmental impacts are expected to grow despite the efforts to mitigate them. The course will address the key aspects of civil aviation research regarding airline operation, technology, policy, and aircraft design implications to the environment. The course will discuss airport noise, emissions, fuel consumption, and climate change due to aviation.

Econometric Analysis

An important objective of the course is to introduce regression analysis so that students are able to understand its applications in different fields in economics. Specifically, this semester, students will be choosing a research topic related to one of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. They will formulate a research question, compile data and estimate cross-section models using STATA. 

Health and Design Studio

Farmer’s markets, especially in urban neighborhoods, provide opportunities not only for healthy lifestyles through improved nutrition and exercise, but also for sustaining communities.  For seniors, who struggle with loss of community and increasingly isolation as their mobility declines, neighborhood farmers’ markets provide a unique opportunity to overcome barriers to nutrition, activity, inclusion and social connectedness.  Universal design is a key component for ensuring equal access to farmer’s markets.  From the location of the market, to the neighborh

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