Undergraduate

Technical Communication: Make it Sustainable

The poet Ezra Pound’s famous declaration to “Make It New!” has served as a motto for much of twentieth-century life, a battle cry across the arts and sciences to continually innovate, tinker, and push boundaries. As we press deeper into the twenty-first century, our section of Technical Communication will fuse the dynamic spirit of Pound’s modernism with one of the most important cultural and economic concerns of the present era—sustainability.

Biological Principles

This active learning course is designed to have students work on applied problems, including those associated with climate change and human health, by applying the fundamentals of biology. The course has historically engaged in partnerships with Atlanta biologists, most notably those at Atlanta Audubon to monitor the public health and ecological implications of bird strikes in Atlanta. Note: this lecture course has a co-requisite, previously affiliated service-learning lab.

Intro to Research

This course was created to give students the tools and skills necessary to participate in research as an integral component in their undergraduate experience. This course will explore research ethics (satisfying the research ethics requirements for funding through the NSF, NIH or PURA awards), scientific literacy (finding, reading, and writing research papers), and research careers. The course makes frequent use of case studies and discussions and considers the impact of research and industry on communities.

Economics of the Environment

Is economic growth incompatible with environmental quality? This course discusses how human social and economic behavior impacts and is impacted by the environment. We discuss how to design policies that promote economically and environmentally sustainable communities such as carbon pricing and property-rights approaches. In addition, we discuss how communities can manage environmental commons problems by relying on local knowledge, norms, and institutions.

Business Communication

LMC 3403 Bussiness Communication is a course dedicated to finding innovative and synergistic approaches to the community through a multiplicity of communicative practices. The class is part of the WOVEN (Written, Oral, Visual, Electronic and Nonverbal) emphasis at Georgia Tech, something that the class aims varying means. The course centers around start-up culture and entrepreneurship in community art and design. Currently, there are a group of students who are linked to the CS Junior Design class.

Sustainability in American Literary Regionalism

In this section of English 1102, students will read and analyze novels, short stories, and movies grouped together under the genre of American literary regionalism. These texts, created between 1880 and 1950, are concerned with American small towns and rural areas, agriculture and farming science, and community health and development. We will investigate how an earlier generation of writers represented concepts of sustainability and equitability, and how these representations compare to modern-day writing on the same topics.

Sea Level Rise and Coastal Engineering

This course will cover a survey of the modern science of sea level rise and engineering adaptation to ongoing sea level rise. In the first half of the course, students will learn about the Earth system processes which drive sea level rise in Earth’s past and in recent years, and how these processes may change in the future. Students will do a data-driven project exploring historical records of sea level change and variability at individual locations, including a deep dive into the local factors which have driven changes in local sea level.

Government and Housing Markets

Why are we in an affordable housing crisis? What can city planners do to help households at various income levels obtain safe, affordable housing? How can city planners take housing markets into account when planning for transportation, sustainability, and equity to avoid unanticipated consequences? In this class, we will learn the fundamental concepts of housing markets and housing policy.

Urban Transportation

This course is an introduction to urban passenger transportation policy and planning in the US with a sustainability focus. It is structured around three components: (1) History, theory, and problem definition, (2) The planning process, and (3) Solutions and analytical techniques. The course will help to understand the planning process comprehensively along with its multiple dimensions, how our current transportation systems has evolved over time, what is a sustainable system, policies and planning approaches that help is to achieve it, and challenges related to planning.

Race, Medicine, and Science

The primary objective of this course is to study the interrelationship of race, medicine, and science drawing on various literatures such as history, sociology, and anthropology. The course rigorously examines the social, political, and cultural concept of race and its usefulness as an analytical category with a emphasis on American history.

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