Graduate

Introduction to Land Use

Land use planning touches upon all the core areas of sustainable planning practice, from community development, environmental planning, and economic development, to transportation and mobility.  The course introduces the process of land use planning and shows how the plan document is prepared.  It also discussed the criteria for determining good plans and provides an overview of the tools used for implementing sustainable solutions.  We draw from recent experiences with neo-traditional planning, smart growth, climate sensitive design, and smart city debates.

English Service Learning for Sustainable Futures

This English language course will develop spoken and written language skills through the theme of sustainable cities. We will examine environmental and technological issues in sustainability for Atlanta and students’ home country cities. Our primary classroom will be out in Atlanta: visiting examples of sustainable environments and hearing speakers. For service-learning, students will  work with a local after-school program, tutoring, playing with, and teaching children about sustainability.

Development Economics

This is a graduate course on development economics. The course will cover a wide range of topics including how communities differ in terms of: economic growth, poverty, inequality, and human development. The course will help students understand what do we mean by sustainable development, what are the problems in achieving it and how can we overcome those problems.

Drawing on Nature

Our research begins with  a series of direct observation drawing exercises focusing on gesture, proportion, scale, perspective, and composition, followed by studies of master draftsmen such as Michelangelo, Raphael, and da Vinci.  Their great skill as artists was a direct manifestation of their knowledge of plants, animals, scientific principles, and the human figure.  We then are joined by professors from the School of Biology and invited experts, who discuss our drawing observations and help direct our research agenda.

Water, Stormwater, Green Infrastructure, and Designing Sustainable Communities

A workshop focusing on collaborative design – involving architects, planners and engineers -  of sustainable stormwater solutions that contribute to community development. The project focus of the workshop will be within the Proctor Creek Watershed and the Georgia Tech Campus. The workshop includes invited lectures from Atlanta and nationally, seminars on critical topics, and student collaborative teams doing project designs and presentations. 

 

Environmental Geochemistry

Geochemical processes are central to a variety of environmental issues, including the distribution of CO2 on Earth, water quality and the transformation and storage of inorganic and organic contaminants from human activity. 

Vertically Integrated Project: Civic Data and Design

The purpose of this course is to research and develop information, communication, and media systems to address regional civic issues, using techniques from design, computing, and social sciences, in collaboration with government and community partners.  These systems will have real-world impact, and promote social sustainability, equity, and justice.

Foundational Technologies in the Manufacture of Forest Bioproducts

A bio-based economy is emphasized in the course and how renewable resources may be used for the future of the world to replace fossil-based products and materials and energy sources.

Intro to Educational Tech/Educational Tech Theoretical Foundations

In this course we will use theories on learning and design to develop educational technology that facilitates learning about smart cities and sustainable communities.  Students will learn about the value of understanding audiences, theory, and design methods in creating effective educational technology, in the context of teaching the public about how smart cities could impact their lives.

Psychology Research Methods for HCI

How do you know what a user wants to see on a wearable display, whether an app feature is being used, whether a clickable button is better than a swipe, or whether a person who is blind can use your physical product? Research methods for HCI allow you to investigate such questions and develop evidence to inform design decisions. In this course, you will learn about common methods employed in user-centered and evidence-based design. You will also learn how to choose methods, plan studies, and perform research that is inclusive of users with a range of abilities. 

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