Graduate

Proctor Creek Wildlife Assessment Course

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is collaborating with Georgia Tech's College of Sciences and Serve-Learn-Sustain Program to create a summer course that introduces students to ecological monitoring techniques through collecting wildlife data within the Proctor Creek watershed. Located less than a mile from Georgia Tech's campus, the historic Proctor Creek neighborhood has been the focus of a community-led effort to restore streams within the watershed.

Extensive and Intensive Reading in Japanese

During the course, the students will read a lot of authentic materials, including energy, environmental issue, and food bank. The student will visit the Atlanta Community Food Bank in order to understand how a local food bank is organized. After reading about the food bank situation in Japan, the students can compare the Atlanta Community Food Bank with what they have learned about Japan. This is one way for students to gain transnational competence so important in today’s world. This course is open to undergraduate and graduate students of all majors. 

Technology, Representation and Design ("Data Walks")

Today, data on communities in Atlanta are more accessible than ever. Micro and macro changes in the makeup of local neighborhoods can be tracked through tax records, demolition and construction permits, and community surveys, among other sources; all of which might be easily downloaded by anyone with an internet connection. But data can be available, without necessarily being accessible.

Urban Ecological Design

Direct design of cities is often regarded as impossible owing to the fluidity, complexity, and uncertainty entailed in urban systems. And yet, we do design our cities, however imperfectly. Cities are created objects, intended landscapes, that are manageable, experienced and susceptible to analysis (Lynch, 1984). Urban design as a discipline has been focusing on “design” in its professional practices.

Introduction to Historic Preservation

This course will help students develop an understanding of the history, philosophy, organization, current legislation, policies, and practices of historic preservation in the United States. The course is designed to give students an overview of the field and its relationship with other built environment professions, such as architecture, construction, planning, engineering, and landscape architecture and the critical role historic preservation plays in creating sustainable communities. Service projects give students real-life experience in historic preservation.

Policy Tools for Environmental Management

Policy Tools for Environmental Management constructs a general framework for analyzing environmental issues, and develops concepts and techniques for managing environmental systems, within the context of environmental planning and policy within sustainable communities.

Green Construction

The course focuses on strategies and technologies to improve the energy efficiency and performance of buildings, and to reduce the environmental impact of buildings. The course emphasizes technical aspects of building design, materials selection, construction processes, and building operations. The use of objective criteria for assessing building “green-ness”, from meta issues such as building location and site – to operational details such as the selection of cleaning chemicals, is stressed throughout the course.

Healthcare Design of the Future

This active multidisciplinary class provides and introduction to healthcare and healthcare design, focusing on how to identify and evaluate opportunities for innovation; how to set up and analyze field studies; how to conduct multidisciplinary human-centered design projects, and how to express results in written and graphic form, including mock-ups.  Multidisciplinary teams work with healthcare partners such as Children's Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory Healthcare, to develop solutions to empower patients and families, and make healthcare safer and more effective.

Introduction to Land Use

Land use planning touches upon all the core areas of sustainable planning practice, from community development, environmental planning, and economic development, to transportation and mobility.  The course introduces the process of land use planning and shows how the plan document is prepared.  It also discussed the criteria for determining good plans and provides an overview of the tools used for implementing sustainable solutions.  We draw from recent experiences with neo-traditional planning, smart growth, climate sensitive design, and smart city debates.

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