Graduate

Urban Transportation

This course is an introduction to urban passenger transportation policy and planning in the US with a sustainability focus. It is structured around three components: (1) History, theory, and problem definition, (2) The planning process, and (3) Solutions and analytical techniques. The course will help to understand the planning process comprehensively along with its multiple dimensions, how our current transportation systems has evolved over time, what is a sustainable system, policies and planning approaches that help is to achieve it, and challenges related to planning.

Policy Tools for Environmental Management

Given its wide impact on community well-being and the economy, it should be no surprise that U.S. environmental policy engenders controversy. This is particularly apparent since the 2016 elections. Many questions arise. Have environmental laws worked effectively to improve the quality of the environment? How can society best establish environmental policies and management systems when faced with scientific uncertainties and significant economic costs? What is the role and effectiveness of command-and-control regulation?

Introduction to Land Use Planning

Land use planning touches upon all the core areas of sustainable planning practice, from community development, environmental planning, and economic development, to transportation/mobility and climate change. The course introduces the process of land use planning and shows how the plan document is prepared. It also discussed the criteria for determining good plans and provides an overview of the tools used for implementing sustainable solutions. We draw from recent experiences with neo-traditional planning, smart growth, climate sensitive design, and smart city debates.

Information and Communication Technologies and Development

This course focuses on information and communication technology (ICT) design, adoption, and use as seen through the lens of global development. We will begin with studying the history of technological advancement, the global development discourse (from the 1940s to the present era), poverty as experienced, before we engage with the design thinking process. We will then shift our gaze to particular domains of global development, discuss important questions and concerns in these areas of work in the present day, before asking what all this means for us as local and global citizens.

French Culture II

The course will include several projects focused on the study of sustainable communities in the city of Metz, France. Students will visit various associations and community organizations about once every 2 weeks for 2 to 3 hours. Visits and service learning may replace classes on campus.

Extreme Atlanta: Climate Change in Urban Spaces

In this unique project-based interdisciplinary course, students will be exposed to local problems within the greater Atlanta, GA region tied to global climate change. Students will investigate local impacts in the context of atmospheric, hydrological and land processes on the city, including a detailed look at the biological impacts to organisms in this region (including humans)!

Health and Wellness Studio

Universal design is a key component for ensuring equal access to farmer’s markets.  From the location of the market, to the neighborhood infrastructure to support mobility, to the layout of the market, to the design of farmer’s stands and community-related activities, design impacts equitability and usability of every aspect of a farmer’s market.  The course focuses on an on-campus pop-up market with partner GFMA (Georgia Farmer's Market Association) as a case study of design for sustainable and inclusive communities.

Biorefining

Biomass is the only renewable source of organic carbon. Many efforts have been made in recent year to develop economically viable processes for converting biomass into novel products like fuels, chemicals, and materials. Examples of products include ethanol and alkanes as biofuels, bulk chemicals like ethylene glycol and phenol, and composite materials containing biomass-derived fibers. However, the complexity of the feedstock and required process conditions have presented significant challenges for many applications.

Sustainable Food Systems

Food nourishes not only our bodies, but our spirits, families, and communities. At its best, food is healthful, economically sustainable, culturally appropriate and environmentally beneficial. Yet, all too often and for too many people, the quantity, quality and character of food remains inadequate for individual nutrition and damaging to our economy, society and environment. Food production and distribution is increasingly mono-culture, globalized and processed, with significant impacts on human well-being, climate, environment, economy, and culture.

Solar Decathlon Design Challenge

This independent study is dedicated to completing Georgia Tech’s entry to the US Department of Energy’s Solar Decathlon Design Challenge for 2019.  A team of students will ultimately produce a design for a net-zero ready building according to the DoE’s requirements and, should the team be selected as a finalist based on an interim report, present this to industry experts at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado in mid April 2019.  This design will be documented at a level that it could be handed to a general contractor as-is for construct

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