Graduate

Life Cycle Assessment

Life Cycle Assessment, ISYE 8813 teaches the methods of evaluating life cycle environmental, economic, and social impacts of products and services. Open to graduate students of all majors, this course includes work on an individual life cycle assessment matched to your interests and graduate program. Previous projects have included the life cycle impacts of clothing, the impacts of a large local Georgia coal plant, comparison of transportation technologies including electric vehicles, using solar energy for fertilizer production in India, and electricity in sub-Saharan Africa.

Sustainable Food Systems

Food nourishes not only our bodies, but our spirits, families, and communities. At its best, food is healthful, economically sustainable, culturally appropriate and environmentally beneficial. Yet, all too often and for too many people, the quantity, quality and character of food remains inadequate for individual nutrition and damaging to our economy, society and environment.

City Literacy: What Makes a Great City

If you have wondered why American cities today are simultaneously sites of hyper-investment (New York) and radical disinvestment (Detroit); why European cities privilege public spaces and life lived in public spaces (Barcelona); why Asian cities (Hong Kong) appear to have addressed the Coronavirus public health emergency better than others . . . Three basic questions provide the framework for this course: What makes a great city – its physical form or the life it affords its inhabitants? How do cities come to be – how do they start? How do they develop?

French Culture II

Proficiency-based introduction to selected socio-cultural aspects of France with a focus on sustainability-related issues and initiatives in France and the francophone world (green transportation, renewable sources of energy, ecovillages, zero plastic initiatives, social entrepreneurship etc.); incorporates grammar review. Conducted in French.

Energy, Environment, and Policy

This course explores the interplay between energy security, environmental stewardship, and society acceptance. For this reason, it is important to understand the environmental consequences of energy policy choices (and vice versa) as well as the necessity of Community and societal buy-in if sustainability is to be realized. We explore this interplay in the range of policy approaches pursued in various countries, including the United Sates, Japan, China, and the European Union.

Educational Applications of New Media

This course asks how selected educational theories can inform tangible media design to support informed action on environmental challenges. We will ask how to use such approaches to support creativity, engagement, and education on issues such as pollution, waste, and recycling. The goal is to combine physical computing and material design as applied educational technologies to educate and activate response to specific environmental challenges. We will focus on challenges on the Georgia Tech campus and problems we face every day as students or staff.

Storytelling and Social Change: Russian Literature, Film, and Ethnography

This course investigates the form and contexts of Russian prose, film, and documentary storytelling that challenges norms and seeks social change. Authors will include Tolstoy, Chekhov, Zoshchenko, Tokareva, and Ulitskaya among others. We will also work with Soviet and contemporary films, and ethnographic media, considering through these various forms why storytelling endures as a medium for transforming people and environments.

Project Studio

What new cultures of computing are needed for the Anthropocene? How can we re-design the invention, consumption, and use of computing amid climate change? What are responsible futures of computing in times of environmental upheaval? In this project studio course, we will draw on methods and theories from design, art, the humanities and social sciences to critically re-imagine computing in the Anthropocene.

Architecture & Ecology

In our time of climate change, this course brings together people and discourses from many disciplines in pursuit of more resilient social-ecological systems within our built environments through dialogue, interdisciplinary research, design, and action. The course provides introductions to design research methodologies, critical theories and practices of ecological science and thinking, and those of sustainability through readings and dialogue with distinguished researchers working in these areas.

Design + Research Studio

Key to the course is the incorporation of high performance active and passive energy systems into very well-conceived and executed building and site design propositions. The key metric for the studio is “prove it.” The studio is structured around the topics of Component Development and Transformation, Body, Enclosure and Site Ideation, and Building Type and Systems Development / Customization.

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