Core Area E: Social Sciences

Data Science for Policy

This course provides an introduction to public policy analytics. Students will gain hands-on experience with data discovery, measurement, field testing and policy evaluation, including training in data ethics and human subjects protections. Case examples and projects will draw upon both experimental and observational research as well as large-scale civic data on sustainable communities. For Fall 2022, the course is partnering with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored Jump into STEM competition (https://jumpintostem.org) focused on building energy efficiency.

The City in U.S. History

This course surveys the development of cities in the territory that became the United States – from bustling colonial seaports, to dense industrial centers, to sprawling postmodern metropolises.  Such topics as leisure, pleasure, reform, environment, trade, commerce, politics, im/migration, work, family, community, racial and class inequality, suburbanization, planning, redevelopment, gentrification, crime, and homelessness will be covered.

Introduction to Urban and Regional Planning

This course provides an overview of the planning of cities and metropolitan regions.  The legal and historical context as well as substantive areas or urban planning are addressed. Tensions among economic, environmental, and equity results of public policies and private developments are examined.  Tools for involving stakeholders in planning decisions are surveyed.

Introduction to Museum Studies

This introductory class in museum studies is a studio history class, in which you will be learning about museums by researching, doing, and creating. In Spring 2022 we have a unique opportunity to collaborate with the Historic Oakland Foundation and Serve, Learn, Sustain. Our exhibit will be about Atlanta’s Oakland Cemetery, and we will consider Diversity, Equity, Access, and Inclusion as we prepare our exhibit.

Global Economics

In my section of ECON 2101 we start with one of the biggest issues that the global community faces today – inequality. More generally, we first start with the empirical focus on the current state of global economy and move on to how the latest economic theory helps us understand it as is, and, hopefully, make it better.

Sustainability, Technology, and Policy

The goal of this course is to provide a solid introduction to the concept of sustainable growth and development. Students will learn how to professionally navigate the current debate on sustainability and to assess strategies to promote sustainable communities and a sustainable planet. The course will blend qualitative and quantitative analysis of sustainable development, with large use of data analysis to measure progress towards sustainable development.

Culture & Society: Cultural Wars & War Culture

This course is an exploration of questions and themes in cultural sociology with a focus on the Middle East. The course is fully remote with one synchronous session each week. It fulfills non-U.S. requirement for HTS majors. Students will have the opportunity to collaborate with different initiatives and work on projects focused on social and cultural sustainability on campus. Assignments will allow students to create cultural products in their medium of choice such as short videos, info graphs, paper, websites, or podcasts to give voice to peacemaking efforts.

Social Issues and Public Policy

This course focuses on social issues associated with American society, as well as public policy used to address these issues, by taking a critical sociological perspective in analyzing U.S. culture and capitalism and its impact on our social institutions, social inequalities, and the quality of our democracy. We focus on comparisons of the U.S. with other affluent, market-based countries in order to understand the uniqueness of American society.

Introduction to Urban and Regional Planning

This course provides an overview of the planning of cities and metropolitan regions.  The legal and historical context as well as substantive areas or urban planning are addressed. Tensions among economic, environmental, and equity results of public policies and private developments are examined.  Tools for involving stakeholders in planning decisions are surveyed.

City Literacy: What Makes a Great City

If you have wondered why American cities today are simultaneously sites of hyper-investment (New York) and radical disinvestment (Detroit); why European cities privilege public spaces and life lived in public spaces (Barcelona); why Asian cities (Hong Kong) appear to have addressed the Coronavirus public health emergency better than others . . . Three basic questions provide the framework for this course: What makes a great city – its physical form or the life it affords its inhabitants? How do cities come to be – how do they start? How do they develop?

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