Core Area D: Natural Sciences, Math, Technology

Earth Processes

This class is designed to familiarize students with the fundamental principles of earth science and how these principles relate to “real world” problems and applied science. The interrelationships between plate tectonics, rock and mineral types, geologic structures and hazards, and natural resources such as ground and surface water are emphasized.

Ecology

Ecology is a flipped course where students work on applied problems, including those associated with climate change, invasive species, overexploitation etc. The focus is on the ecological concepts, looking at either sustainability or community, with reference to the other, through units, labs, assignments, and activities. 

Technical Communication: Make it Sustainable

The poet Ezra Pound’s famous declaration to “Make It New!” has served as a motto for much of twentieth-century life, a battle cry across the arts and sciences to continually innovate, tinker, and push boundaries. As we press deeper into the twenty-first century, our section of Technical Communication will fuse the dynamic spirit of Pound’s modernism with one of the most important cultural and economic concerns of the present era—sustainability.

Biological Principles

This active learning course is designed to have students work on applied problems, including those associated with climate change and human health, by applying the fundamentals of biology. The course has historically engaged in partnerships with Atlanta biologists, most notably those at Atlanta Audubon to monitor the public health and ecological implications of bird strikes in Atlanta. Note: this lecture course has a co-requisite, previously affiliated service-learning lab.

Introduction to Land Use Planning

Land use planning touches upon all the core areas of sustainable planning practice, from community development, environmental planning, and economic development, to transportation/mobility and climate change. The course introduces the process of land use planning and shows how the plan document is prepared. It also discussed the criteria for determining good plans and provides an overview of the tools used for implementing sustainable solutions. We draw from recent experiences with neo-traditional planning, smart growth, climate sensitive design, and smart city debates.

Ecology

Ecology is a flipped course where students work on applied problems, including those associated with climate change, invasive species, overexploitation etc. The focus is on the ecological concepts, looking at either sustainability or community, with reference to the other, through units, labs, assignments, and activities. 

Chemical Principles I Laboratory

The laboratory portion of this course focuses on foundational principles and essential techniques of chemistry. These conceptual and technical tools have great relevance to many issues of importance to society, including climate change, human health, economic security, and more. SLS-related experiments in CHEM 1211K will be related to five threads of sustainability in chemistry: Green Chemistry, Chemistry and Society, Everyday Chemical Analysis, Computational Chemistry, and Climate Change.

Ecology Lab

Ecology Lab covers basic ecological phenomenon using urban ecological settings as the backdrop. As a class, we visit areas in the metro-Atlanta community to understand human-environment interactions within our ecosystem. We immerse ourselves in these communities to understand the short- and long-term consequences of environmental change and what ecologically can be done to keep ecosystems-- and related neighborhoods-- thriving.

Chemical Principles II Laboratory

The laboratory portion of this course focuses on foundational principles and essential techniques of chemistry.  These conceptual and technical tools have great relevance to many issues of importance to society, including climate change, human health, economic security, and more. SLS-related experiments in CHEM 1212K will be related to five threads of sustainability in chemistry: Green Chemistry, Chemistry and Society, Everyday Chemical Analysis, Computational Chemistry, and Climate Change.

Introduction to Environmental Science

Understanding our planet’s environment requires understanding how the whole Earth functions as an interconnected system. This course investigates the four components of the Earth system in detail: the atmosphere, the oceans, the solid Earth, and the biosphere to understand how these processes interact, and then how we, as humans, impact our planet.

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