Core Area A1: Communication Outcomes

English Composition 2 (Public Interest Technology)

This course focuses on current conversation surrounding disasters, calamities, and apocalyptic events, both in real life and fictional contexts, moving from the context of global perspectives on the end of the world to local efforts to mitigate apocalyptic events.

Atlanta's Persistent Memory

How do we, as (part-time, full-time, or temporary) citizens of Atlanta, uncover the diverse layers of the past which structure our campus, the city, and other places that we inhabit, pass through, or imagine? Atlanta’s streets, avenues, green spaces, and buildings may look permanent but instead are in a constant state of flux. What was here before? What will be here in the future?

Socio-Economic Ecologies of the Atlanta Home

This course focuses on the socio-economic ecologies that support (or not) the sustainable Purpose Built Communities Model. Organizations like the Grove Park Foundation in Atlanta aim to target issues like unequal housing and education through initiatives such as Mixed Income Housing, Cradle-to-College Education, and community health and wellness programs. However, issues like gentrification, environmental degradation, and economic crises hinder this equitable decision making.

The End is Nigh, Eventually: Global and Local Approaches to the Pre-Apocalypse

Apocalypse (noun): From the Greek apokálypsis, 'Uncovering' The end of the world. The great calamity. The apocalypse. Discussions of climate change, natural disasters, pandemics, and violence have become an everyday occurrence, and the rhetoric surrounding these ideas is often nihilistic -- focused on the inevitability of our destruction – or post-apocalyptic – fixated on how humanity recovers after catastrophic events. But what does it mean to experience the time preceding an apocalypse?

Postcolonial Ecofeminism

This course will enable you to become a more effective communicator in various modes, media, and genres by introducing you to diverse representations of postcolonial ecologies. In this course you will watch films and documentaries, read essays, graphic narratives, and short stories, and look at digital story maps to explore the plurality across media of rhetorical constructions of environmental justice. We will begin with analyzing what environmental justice looks like in the postcolonial condition.

Women in Literature, Science, & Technology

This writing and communication class focuses on women’s writing in the 20th and 21st centuries in literature, science, and technology. Through multiple modes of communication – fiction, poetry, essays, films, and academic scholarship – we think about the challenges, inequalities, and pleasures of women and the society and culture in which we operate.  

Representing Environmental Justice

Even as the proliferation of new media platforms has made it possible for individuals and institutions to publicize the causes and consequences of climate change to a broader audience than ever before, the interrelationship between environmental degradation and racism remains underrepresented.

Sustainable Communities and the Refugee Experience: The Community, Knowledge, and Praxis of Atlanta-area Refugee Organizations

The questions surrounding the refugee experience are the principal humanistic questions of the twenty-first century. Readings and films in this course will demonstrate how sustainability, growth, and progress must be shaped by an understanding of the life, work, and future of people displaced by war, environmental crises, and violence (including the violence of the state upon its own citizens).

Technical Communication and Environmental Justice

Even as the proliferation of new media platforms has made it possible for activists and community organizations to publicize the causes and consequences of climate change to a broader audience than ever before, the overlap of environmental degradation and racism remains underrepresented.

Environmental Literature and Communication

The crisis of climate change demands that we understand the natural world and find new ways of communicating its value to each other. In many ways the lack of action on climate change is not a failure of science, but rather of science and environmental communication. This class looks to prepare Tech students by introducing them to environmental literature and communication, so that they can be better environmental communicators.

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