School of Industrial Design

Health and Wellness Studio

Universal design is a key component for ensuring equal access to farmer’s markets.  From the location of the market, to the neighborhood infrastructure to support mobility, to the layout of the market, to the design of farmer’s stands and community-related activities, design impacts equitability and usability of every aspect of a farmer’s market.  The course focuses on an on-campus pop-up market with partner GFMA (Georgia Farmer's Market Association) as a case study of design for sustainable and inclusive communities.

Health, Community & Universal Design: A Focus on Neighborhood Farmers Markets

Universal Design in the Built Environment is a project-based, 3-credit course that explores the implications of human ability on the usability of places, products, interfaces, and systems for all individuals.  Course projects will engage students in solving real world problems through community-driven partnerships with the Georgia Farmers Markets Association and local markets.  Using a universal design approach, students will learn how to design for social impact and community health through a focus on local farmer's markets as a locus for social engagement, activity, and good

Prototyping Practices for Innovation

Prototypes are typically thought of as nearly complete products or technologies which are used to conduct system, alpha or beta testing near the end of a development process. This course is designed to expand on the idea of prototyping and teach how to employ a variety of tools as methods to inspire, contextualize, evaluate and inform any phase of any research or development activity.

Health and Design Studio

Farmer’s markets, especially in urban neighborhoods, provide opportunities not only for healthy lifestyles through improved nutrition and exercise, but also for sustaining communities.  For seniors, who struggle with loss of community and increasingly isolation as their mobility declines, neighborhood farmers’ markets provide a unique opportunity to overcome barriers to nutrition, activity, inclusion and social connectedness.  Universal design is a key component for ensuring equal access to farmer’s markets.  From the location of the market, to the neighborh

Sustainable Systems Design

This class covers two tools for exploring and evaluating during a sustainable design or decision-making process: life cycle analysis and system dynamics. Students will apply these tools to a research topic of interest, exploring implications for understanding communities and designing systems or artifacts. This class is a graduate course but is open to seniors.

Design in Public Health

This course will explore the intersection of design and public/community health. We will be looking at the relevance of designing products and services for social impact and learning how to approach design in order to improve a population’s health, internationally and domestically. The course will be taught through case studies ranging from global organizations to projects that have been created and nurtured here at Georgia Tech.

Jonathan Colton
Professor
Mary Kathleen Whitney
Graduate Research Assistant
Craig Stehle
Craig Stehle
Lecturer
Jon Sanford
Jon Sanford
SLS SCCC Fellow
Director of CATEA and Professor

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