School of History and Sociology

Special Topics: The Sociological Imagination

“The Sociological Imagination” takes seriously the call by C. Wright Mills to combine history and biography as a means to better understand how social forces and structures impact individual lives by reading a biography and analyzing an individual life sociologically. For this class, students will be reading The Autobiography of Malcolm X as told to Alex Haley.

Organizing for Social Change

“If not us, then who? If not now, then when? Hillel the Elder Collective action enables groups of people to advance solutions to complex social and environmental challenges. In a democratic society, organized groups are better able to develop, articulate, and assert shared interests to advance equity, accountability, effectiveness, and sustainability in social institutions. Individuals and groups often use similar strategies to advance social change within organizations, from universities to corporations and government agencies.

The City in U.S. History

This course surveys the development of cities in the territory that became the United States – from bustling colonial seaports, to dense industrial centers, to sprawling postmodern metropolises.  Such topics as leisure, pleasure, reform, environment, trade, commerce, politics, im/migration, work, family, community, racial and class inequality, suburbanization, planning, redevelopment, gentrification, crime, and homelessness will be covered.

Introduction to Museum Studies

This introductory class in museum studies is a studio history class, in which you will be learning about museums by researching, doing, and creating. In Spring 2022 we have a unique opportunity to collaborate with the Historic Oakland Foundation and Serve, Learn, Sustain. Our exhibit will be about Atlanta’s Oakland Cemetery, and we will consider Diversity, Equity, Access, and Inclusion as we prepare our exhibit.

Special Topics: Equity and Community Engagement

Inequalities between and within communities across the United States have become glaringly obvious in the last several years due to intersecting disasters like poverty, pollution, climate change, and COVID-19. In this course, students will use historical and sociological approaches to explore community assets, vulnerabilities, and inequalities related to these intersecting disasters, as well as learn and apply respectful and appropriate ways to engage with communities during these disastrous times.

Culture & Society: Cultural Wars & War Culture

This course is an exploration of questions and themes in cultural sociology with a focus on the Middle East. The course is fully remote with one synchronous session each week. It fulfills non-U.S. requirement for HTS majors. Students will have the opportunity to collaborate with different initiatives and work on projects focused on social and cultural sustainability on campus. Assignments will allow students to create cultural products in their medium of choice such as short videos, info graphs, paper, websites, or podcasts to give voice to peacemaking efforts.

Social Issues and Public Policy

This course focuses on social issues associated with American society, as well as public policy used to address these issues, by taking a critical sociological perspective in analyzing U.S. culture and capitalism and its impact on our social institutions, social inequalities, and the quality of our democracy. We focus on comparisons of the U.S. with other affluent, market-based countries in order to understand the uniqueness of American society.

Tech and Environment

This course examines global environmental history from prehistory to the present.

Intro to Sociology

The study of sociology is the study of society, and this introductory course teaches students to see that human communities are more than a collection of individuals, self-determined and self-directing. The course examines structural inequalities, cultural conditions, and social institutions that pattern and shape human behavior. First, students learn that the world around them is not "natural" but rather conditional, and human behavior is not "innate," but mutable through socialization.

American Environmental History

This course surveys the complex ecological, economic, cultural, social, and political outcomes that have resulted from human interactions with the natural world, in the geographical region encompassing the United States.

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