Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts

Spain: Language for Business and Technology

The Spain: Language for Business and Technology (LBAT) Program examines the relationship between Spain and the European Union in the 21st century and then explores issues of social, economic, and environmental sustainability in the Spanish context.

African American Rhetorics of Resistance

As an SLS-affiliated course, African American Rhetorics of Resistance will focus specifically on the role of community in African American arts and letters. Black music, art, and literature is known for exploring racism, but it is equally invested in the power of joy and coalition. This labor has often centralized the role of community institutions, including the church, the school, the town hall meeting, and the protest rally.

Introduction to Global Development

This course introduces students to the history, theory and practice of international development. Students will examine the different meanings and objectives of global development, paying particular attention to economic growth, poverty alleviation, inequality reduction, capability enhancement, the defense of human rights and sustainability.

Animals And/As Technology

To what extent do ideas and initiatives surrounding sustainability extend to nonhuman animals? How does sustainability apply to certain ideals about "nature" and "community" at the inclusion or exclusion of animal life? Who and what gets sustained, and according to what values? To answer these and related questions, this course will examine how video games, literature, and new media texts figure animals and their relationship to nature and technology.

Language for Business and Technology (LBAT): France

This study abroad LBAT (Language for Business and Technology: France) program includes several courses.  One of these, French Culture and Society, is affiliated with SLS.  Participating students will discover another culture's approach to sustainability: in particular, French cultural attitudes toward ecology, pesticides, GMOs, food additives, nuclear energy, and pollution. They will also learn about how these concerns spawn new trends and encourage the development of green alternatives.

Environmental Ethics

This is a practical course in environmental decision making in response to complex, open-ended problem situations.  Students work together in groups to acquire and practice basic tools of systems thinking and ethical inquiry, then bring those tools to bear on problem situations of their own choosing.

Sociology of Medicine and Health

This course will introduce the sociology of medicine and health (also known as medical sociology or sociology of health and illness), which is a broad field examining the social production of health, wellness, illness and mortality. This sub-discipline of sociology starts from the assumption that we cannot understand the topics of health and illness simply by looking at biological phenomena and medical knowledge.

Extensive and Intensive Reading in Japanese

During the course, the students will read a lot of authentic materials, including energy, environmental issue, and food bank. The student will visit the Atlanta Community Food Bank in order to understand how a local food bank is organized. After reading about the food bank situation in Japan, the students can compare the Atlanta Community Food Bank with what they have learned about Japan. This is one way for students to gain transnational competence so important in today’s world. This course is open to undergraduate and graduate students of all majors. 

Technology, Representation and Design ("Data Walks")

Today, data on communities in Atlanta are more accessible than ever. Micro and macro changes in the makeup of local neighborhoods can be tracked through tax records, demolition and construction permits, and community surveys, among other sources; all of which might be easily downloaded by anyone with an internet connection. But data can be available, without necessarily being accessible.

Making the List: Banned Books, Best Sellers, and Best Of

What makes a book a success? In this writing course, we will examine three measures of book quality: literary prizes, bestseller lists, and the banned book list. The course will include projects that enhance written, oral, visual, electronic and nonverbal (WOVEN) communication skills while honing students’ ability to think and talk critically about literature, culture, and consumer habits within a wide variety of reading communities and other audiences.

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