Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts

Sustaining Ecologies

The Path Foundation, Trees Atlanta, Friends of the Beltline, ATL Urban Farms, Aware Wildlife Center: these are just some local organizations working to sustain ecologies in Atlanta. Over the course of this class, we will visit and host guests from urban farms and farmer’s markets, as well as wildlife centers, green spaces, and the Beltline, so that students can identify and describe the relationship between the ecological and the social in their communities.

Energy Policy and Markets

The class will introduce students to energy technologies, with specific regards to markets and policy. The objective of the course is to provide the economist’s perspective on a broad range of topics that professionals in the energy industry will encounter.

Women in Science Fiction

Women in Science Fiction studies women writers, artists, and musicians who use science fiction to propose and debate how we might make our world more sustainable. Engaging topics like race, gender, and the environment, these women craft futures that may sometimes appear fantastical or otherwise out of reach. However, this course asserts the real-world stakes of its subject matter for Georgia Tech students. Our readings will spur discussions and assignments about today’s sustainability challenges. This will include an exciting partnership with Prof.

France Today I (Sustainable Communities in France)

NOTE: This course is taught at Georgia Tech Lorraine (GTL) in Metz, France.

Field Work Abroad (Local Sustainability Practices)

NOTE: This course is taught at Georgia Tech Lorraine (GTL) in Metz, France.

Environmentalism and Ecocriticism

Environmentalism and Ecocriticism—The Cultural History of Trees, A Hands-on Learning Project Wood has been the most important material in the history of human technological practices, yet today it seems to have been reduced to crooked 2x4s sold at the local home center. This seminar will examine trees and lumber as they function in human technological practices and in our culture. We will study how trees figure in current debates about the environment, including tree structure and forest composition, trees and the law, and arguments about plant intelligence.

Big Data and Public Policy

The School of Public Policy is offering a new cross-listed course with the School of Economics in Big Data and Public Policy. This course will provide an introduction to data science tools and methodologies for social science applications. Students will learn to conduct experiments and to identify causal mechanisms in large-scale social and administrative data. The course is targeted for Ph.D. or advanced M.S. students in Public Policy; M.S. students in Economics, and M.S. students in Cybersecurity

Food Literacy of Atlanta

In the past decade Atlanta has undergone phenomenal changes in infrastructure, and food culture because of two things: being a beta-hub in the tech industry, and tax credits that have cultivated a thriving film industry. This influx of people, money, and innovation, restaurant culture has seen tremendous growth. This Serve-Learn-Sustain (SLS) course encourages students to learn the story of Atlanta through its food history.

Globalization in the Modern Era

Globalization in the Modern Era (HTS 3055) will examine the social, political and economic bases for the phenomenon frequently referred to as "globalization." The course will discuss competing theories regarding the rise of globalization, as well as the divergent consequences that this process has left in its wake in different communities around the world. While social, economic, political and environmental inequalities are built into some aspects of globalization, the phenomenon also offers new opportunities and alternatives for development and for resistance.

Social Theory and Structure

Social Theory and Structure (HTS 3102) allows students to read the original writings of the great social thinkers who provided the foundational ideas that inspired the discipline of sociology. Implicit in these theories are fundamental questions about the relationship between the individual and the collective, what drives social change, and what comprises "the good society." The course will focus upon the writings of Karl Marx, Max Weber, Emile Durkheim and W.E.B. DuBois, as well as others.

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