Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts

Science, Art, and Justice

Everything is political, from science to art. In an era of climate change, protests for racial justice, and rising inequality, it is more important than ever to understand the relationship between science and art in effecting public opinion. This course will explore, briefly, the relationship between science and art in a few moments of modern human history—slavery, colonialization, industrialization, the development of fossil fuels, the development of nuclear power, and climate change.

#BirdComm

Social media has changed the ways we communicate about science (#SciComm), and this is especially true of the citizen scientists, ornithologists, and plain old enthusiasts who log on to talk about birds. In this remote asynchronous course, we will consider not only contemporary #BirdComm but also how these conversations have changed over the past 150 years.

Climate Policy

This course aims to address the whole complexity of climate change, by bringing together the science of climate change, the analysis of impacts, and the economic and engineering strategies to reduce emissions.  In this class, students will be actively engaged in exploring the scientific and economic issues underlying the threat of global climate change and the institutions engaged in negotiating an international response.

Modern Iran: Tehran on Screen

The course Modern Iran: Tehran on Screen is an exploration of modern Iran through cinematic representations of its capital city, Tehran and has the following four goals. First, it trains students to become participants in debates about the Iranian Cinema, mediated representations of Tehran, as well as Iranian arts, urban culture and society. In doing so, it introduces students to dominant paradigms of cinematic arts, urban social development and welfare, and situates such paradigms in the contemporary history of Iran.

Reel Cities: Public Spaces and Social Issues

The Reel Cities: Public Spaces & Social Issues is a course where students learn about the urban sociology of the Middle East through movies. This class has the following four goals. First, it trains students to become participants in debates about mediated representations of the Middle East, global violence, urbanism, poverty, and inequality. In doing so, it introduces students to dominant paradigms of urban development, sustainability, and social welfare and situates such paradigms in the 20th and the 21st century history of the Middle East.

Social Issues and Public Policy

This course focuses on social issues associated with American society, as well as public policy used to address these issues, by taking a critical sociological perspective in analyzing U.S. culture and capitalism and its impact on our social institutions, social inequalities, and the quality of our democracy. We focus on comparisons of the U.S. with other affluent, market-based countries in order to understand the uniqueness of American society.

This is Fine - Humor, Media, and Climate Change

Recent IPCC predictions argue that the world has ten years to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by half. Ten years to take a range of overlapping and dependent cultural, economic, and technological systems and reduce their carbon footprint by half. And only about thirty years to make these systems carbon neutral. The world Tech students will enter after ‘getting out’ will be dramatically warmer and more unstable that the one their parents and grandparents entered.

The Poetics of Sustainability: Race and the Environment

Utilizing our WOVEN curriculum, this Serve-Learn-Sustain affiliated course will explore the intersections of race, immigration, and the environment as urgent social, political, and ecological issues through the lens of poetry.

Back to the Future

The cumulative consequences of the Anthropocene—warming, carbon emission, species loss, deforestation, melting, ocean acidification, and the global waste crisis—make the future of life on earth difficult to imagine. Throughout most of human history, we have relied on models such as generational inheritance or market growth to figure what lies ahead, but if the last few years are any indication, the rhetoric we use to project the future is increasingly insufficient.

French Culture II

Proficiency-based introduction to selected socio-cultural aspects of France with a focus on sustainability-related issues and initiatives in France and the francophone world (green transportation, renewable sources of energy, ecovillages, zero plastic initiatives, social entrepreneurship etc.); incorporates grammar review. Conducted in French.

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