Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts

Rhetorics of Crisis

“Rhetorics of Crisis” will study the literary, cultural, and scientific rhetorics surrounding what are often depicted as three independent crises: climate change, refugee and migrant issues, and terrorism/ISIS. Throughout this course, we will make connections among these major global events, which are too often thought of as separate, but are in reality closely interlinked.

Environmentalism and Ecocriticism

Limited to Honors Program students, Environmentalism and Ecocriticism—The Cultural History of Trees.  This seminar will examine tree as they function in human technological practices, in our culture, and as source of food. We will study how trees figure in current debates about the environment, including tree structure and forest composition, trees and the law, arguments about plant intelligence, and sustainable food production in an era of environmental degradation. Not content with just reading about trees, we will also do some harvesting.

Language for Business and Technology (LBAT): France

Some courses in the LBAT France program will introduce students to the theory, principles, and practices of sustainability. They will include discussions on maintaining ecological and environmental health, creating economic welfare, and ensuring social justice. Courses focus is on sustainable development and communities in Paris, France. Students meet both in class and in town. They may interview people, shoot videos, report on sustainability practices, create websites.

Junior Design (Part 1): Project Design and Technical Communication Strategies

This course is part 1 of a two-semester Junior Design capstone course sequence that includes a computer science and technical communication component. This semester teams will develop a software solution to a problem defined by a real-world client. The semester culminates in the development of a prototype and its demonstration in a formal presentation. Supporting deliverables that teams create include a project vision statement, user stories, and a usability/design support document.

Composing Empire and Revolution

In the exuberant Lin-Manuel Miranda Hamilton musical, the American Revolution is re-imagined as a modern hip-hop rebellion against the stodgy, Beatles-esque musical stylings of the British Empire. Led by “young, scrappy, and hungry” Alexander Hamilton, the upstart crew of young friends – Hamilton, John Laurens, Hercules Mulligan, and the Marquis de Lafayette – lead a revolution against the confused and vain King George. The victory is presented as a joyful one – “We won! We won! We won!

Technical Communication for Business Majors

After completing the first course module on personal branding, students will turn their attention to climate-related issues. Working in conjunction with several programs and initiatives both on and off campus, students will consider how climate-related issues affect us both as individuals and employees. For the second course module, students will select a Georgia-based company within the industry they hope to enter, or within which they are already working.

Standing Peachtree and Indigenous New Media

Indigenous knowledges and stories are mapped onto the land beneath your feet and mediated through oral and material modes. Indigenous knowledges and stories continue to be sovereign, embodied through various methods of meaning-making. This course focuses on the rhetorical practices of Native/American Indian communities and how those practices “make” meaning within indigenous communities.

Graphic Medicine: Comics and Mental Illness

Students will have the opportunity to share research about mental health issues by creating digital comics that reduce the stigma surrounding mental illness and that educate the Georgia Tech community about mental health resources on campus.

Extensive and Intensive Reading in Japanese

This course utilizes authentic reading materials like Japanese newspaper articles related sustainability issues* and novels, essays, manga and folk tales. The students will acquire extensive and intensive reading skills through collaborative pair-work activities, class discussion, and writing assignment. These skills and knowledge of sustainability issues in Japanese society are highly useful and respected in professional environments.

Cultures of Waste: Disease and Environment

This course explores literary and cultural representations of bodily and industrial waste alongside wasting diseases to explore how the nineteenth century produced ideas about waste that continue to influence contemporary work in the fields of epidemiology, civil engineering, public health, environmental science, and medicine.

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