Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts

Economics of the Environment

Is economic growth incompatible with environmental quality? This course discusses how human social and economic behavior impacts and is impacted by the environment. We discuss how to design policies that promote economically and environmentally sustainable communities such as carbon pricing and property-rights approaches. In addition, we discuss how communities can manage environmental commons problems by relying on local knowledge, norms, and institutions.

Business Communication

LMC 3403 Bussiness Communication is a course dedicated to finding innovative and synergistic approaches to the community through a multiplicity of communicative practices. The class is part of the WOVEN (Written, Oral, Visual, Electronic and Nonverbal) emphasis at Georgia Tech, something that the class aims varying means. The course centers around start-up culture and entrepreneurship in community art and design. Currently, there are a group of students who are linked to the CS Junior Design class.

Sustainability in American Literary Regionalism

In this section of English 1102, students will read and analyze novels, short stories, and movies grouped together under the genre of American literary regionalism. These texts, created between 1880 and 1950, are concerned with American small towns and rural areas, agriculture and farming science, and community health and development. We will investigate how an earlier generation of writers represented concepts of sustainability and equitability, and how these representations compare to modern-day writing on the same topics.

Environmental Justice in Global Literature and Media

Students in this course learn about how communities in diverse parts of the world are meeting the challenges posed by unsustainable development and environmental degradation.

Imagining the City

In this first year writing and communication course you will consider how your work at Tech and after Tech may interact with and affect urban communities and the people who live in them. We will begin by examining our own backgrounds--whether you're a life long city dweller or whether you grew up in a rural or suburban area--and how they have shaped our attitudes toward Atlanta and toward cities generally. These backgrounds, we will see, may condition our attitudes toward the development of urban space.

Rhetoric and Poetics of Food Communities

This course is a service learning course focused on the interaction of communication and narrative in social justice (and specifically social justice in food and community). This course uses the living-learning opportunity to foster community engagement within the GATech Community. This course encourages students to learn the story of social justice in Atlanta and the south through its food history, and ask  bigger questions of its food futures. This course pairs with community engaged partners to pursue SLS Big Ideas, and community health partnerships.

Immoral Energy: Slavery and Fossil Fuels in the Anthropocene

Energy systems are permeated with political and ethical questions, and no historical system demonstrates that as well as transatlantic slavery. Before fossil fuels, the bodies and labor of enslaved peoples powered trade. While at first slavery helped support the expansion of fossil fuels, eventually fossil fuels replaced slavery. This course will explore the ethical/moral valences of energy systems through a juxtaposition of transatlantic slavery and modern fossil fuels. The first half of the class will focus on the abolition debate.

Intro to Sociology

The study of sociology is the study of society, and this introductory course teaches students to see that human communities are more than a collection of individuals, self-determined and self-directing. The course examines structural inequalities, cultural conditions, and social institutions that pattern and shape human behavior. First, students learn that the world around them is not "natural" but rather conditional, and human behavior is not "innate," but mutable through socialization.

American Environmental History

This course surveys the complex ecological, economic, cultural, social, and political outcomes that have resulted from human interactions with the natural world, in the geographical region encompassing the United States.

Japan Today

Japan Today is a Japanese language course held in Beppu Japan during the summer abroad program that is organized around the theme of environmental sustainability. We discuss topics including solar energy, thermal energy, biomass, garbage disposal, local produce, and the Japanese concept of "mottainai" (trying to avoid wasting things). We also take students on a farmstay, to a geothermal plant, and to an elementary school. This is a community-driven course focused on teaching students how to think about issues of sustainability in Japan.

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