Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts

Writing, Reading, and Resilience

I am in conversation with CARE/Counseling Center to devise materials that could extend these tools beyond the classroom and into the broader Georgia Tech student community. In addition, I intend reach out to a new community partner to explore how we might address the inequalities of mental health and self-care for people of color. I would like to invite the Atlanta-based art-activist group “The Nap Ministry” to give a workshop to the class.

Principles of Macroeconomics

The core objective of the Principles of Macroeconomics course is to familiarize students with how policy makers at the Federal level are thinking about the national economy, its health, the inevitable booms and busts, and what needs to be done to mediate the volatility of business cycle fluctuations.

Educational Applications of New Media

This course asks how selected educational theories can inform tangible media design to support informed action on environmental challenges. We will ask how to use such approaches to support creativity, engagement, and education on issues such as pollution, waste, and recycling. The goal is to combine physical computing and material design as applied educational technologies to educate and activate response to specific environmental challenges. We will focus on challenges on the Georgia Tech campus and problems we face every day as students or staff.

Storytelling and Social Change: Russian Literature, Film, and Ethnography

This course investigates the form and contexts of Russian prose, film, and documentary storytelling that challenges norms and seeks social change. Authors will include Tolstoy, Chekhov, Zoshchenko, Tokareva, and Ulitskaya among others. We will also work with Soviet and contemporary films, and ethnographic media, considering through these various forms why storytelling endures as a medium for transforming people and environments.

Project Studio

What new cultures of computing are needed for the Anthropocene? How can we re-design the invention, consumption, and use of computing amid climate change? What are responsible futures of computing in times of environmental upheaval? In this project studio course, we will draw on methods and theories from design, art, the humanities and social sciences to critically re-imagine computing in the Anthropocene.

The Shape of the City: Gentrification and Culture in Atlanta and America

Gentrification—the economic and cultural “revitalization” of American cities--has been, for better or worse, the defining feature of urban life in the twentyfirst century. As late as the 1990s, the “inner city” was often portrayed in journalism and popular culture as a decaying, crime-ridden ghetto; now it is often seen as a booming, culturally vibrant, economically desirable playground for hipsters and creatives—at least those who can afford it. How did this happen? Is it good or bad? Can gentrification go on forever?

Sovereignty, Energy, and Settler-Colonialism

The wealth of the United States is premised upon many things: hard work, inventiveness, an entrepreneurial spirit, and so on, but its first premise is land. Land that had been tended and kept by Native Americans. Land that was taken, stolen, or bought over the course of American expansion west. These lands offered new sources of biomass, fossil fuels, and even uranium to exploit. The American energy system benefited from these abundant fuels (in addition to the labor of enslaved Blacks).

Atlanta in the 1960s

This course will utilize the materials collected in the Ivan Allen Digital Archive to explore the history of Atlanta in the 1960s through the lens of Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.’s administration (1962-70).

Technical Communication: Make it Sustainable

The poet Ezra Pound’s famous declaration to “Make It New!” has served as a motto for much of twentieth-century life, a battle cry across the arts and sciences to continually innovate, tinker, and push boundaries. As we press deeper into the twenty-first century, our section of Technical Communication will fuse the dynamic spirit of Pound’s modernism with one of the most important cultural and economic concerns of the present era—sustainability.

Sustainability & Development in the Francophone World

This course introduces students to French and Francophone sustainability practices and provides an introduction to French and Francophone social perspectives. This course will be primarily a topics-based course, and each class will focus on a different area of sustainability policy. A strong focus of the class will be in understanding issues in the design, implementation, and evaluation of French and Francophone environmental policy. We will evaluate policies designed to reduce water use and pollution, improve air quality, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

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