Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts

Sovereignty, Energy, and Settler-Colonialism

The wealth of the United States is premised upon many things: hard work, inventiveness, an entrepreneurial spirit, and so on, but its first premise is land. Land that had been tended and kept by Native Americans. Land that was taken, stolen, or bought over the course of American expansion west. These lands offered new sources of biomass, fossil fuels, and even uranium to exploit. The American energy system benefited from these abundant fuels (in addition to the labor of enslaved Blacks).

Atlanta in the 1960s

This course will utilize the materials collected in the Ivan Allen Digital Archive to explore the history of Atlanta in the 1960s through the lens of Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr.’s administration (1962-70).

Technical Communication: Make it Sustainable

The poet Ezra Pound’s famous declaration to “Make It New!” has served as a motto for much of twentieth-century life, a battle cry across the arts and sciences to continually innovate, tinker, and push boundaries. As we press deeper into the twenty-first century, our section of Technical Communication will fuse the dynamic spirit of Pound’s modernism with one of the most important cultural and economic concerns of the present era—sustainability.

Sustainability & Development in the Francophone World

This course introduces students to French and Francophone sustainability practices and provides an introduction to French and Francophone social perspectives. This course will be primarily a topics-based course, and each class will focus on a different area of sustainability policy. A strong focus of the class will be in understanding issues in the design, implementation, and evaluation of French and Francophone environmental policy. We will evaluate policies designed to reduce water use and pollution, improve air quality, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Economics of the Environment

Is economic growth incompatible with environmental quality? This course discusses how human social and economic behavior impacts and is impacted by the environment. We discuss how to design policies that promote economically and environmentally sustainable communities such as carbon pricing and property-rights approaches. In addition, we discuss how communities can manage environmental commons problems by relying on local knowledge, norms, and institutions.

Business Communication

LMC 3403 Bussiness Communication is a course dedicated to finding innovative and synergistic approaches to the community through a multiplicity of communicative practices. The class is part of the WOVEN (Written, Oral, Visual, Electronic and Nonverbal) emphasis at Georgia Tech, something that the class aims varying means. The course centers around start-up culture and entrepreneurship in community art and design. Currently, there are a group of students who are linked to the CS Junior Design class.

Sustainability in American Literary Regionalism

In this section of English 1102, students will read and analyze novels, short stories, and movies grouped together under the genre of American literary regionalism. These texts, created between 1880 and 1950, are concerned with American small towns and rural areas, agriculture and farming science, and community health and development. We will investigate how an earlier generation of writers represented concepts of sustainability and equitability, and how these representations compare to modern-day writing on the same topics.

Environmental Justice in Global Literature and Media

Students in this course learn about how communities in diverse parts of the world are meeting the challenges posed by unsustainable development and environmental degradation.

Imagining the City

In this first year writing and communication course you will consider how your work at Tech and after Tech may interact with and affect urban communities and the people who live in them. We will begin by examining our own backgrounds--whether you're a life long city dweller or whether you grew up in a rural or suburban area--and how they have shaped our attitudes toward Atlanta and toward cities generally. These backgrounds, we will see, may condition our attitudes toward the development of urban space.

Rhetoric and Poetics of Food Communities

This course is a service learning course focused on the interaction of communication and narrative in social justice (and specifically social justice in food and community). This course uses the living-learning opportunity to foster community engagement within the GATech Community. This course encourages students to learn the story of social justice in Atlanta and the south through its food history, and ask  bigger questions of its food futures. This course pairs with community engaged partners to pursue SLS Big Ideas, and community health partnerships.

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