Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts

This is Fine - Humor, Media, and Climate Change

Recent IPCC predictions argue that the world has ten years to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by half. Ten years to take a range of overlapping and dependent cultural, economic, and technological systems and reduce their carbon footprint by half. And only about thirty years to make these systems carbon neutral. The world Tech students will enter after ‘getting out’ will be dramatically warmer and more unstable that the one their parents and grandparents entered.

The Poetics of Sustainability: Race and the Environment

Utilizing our WOVEN curriculum, this Serve-Learn-Sustain affiliated course will explore the intersections of race, immigration, and the environment as urgent social, political, and ecological issues through the lens of poetry.

Back to the Future

The cumulative consequences of the Anthropocene—warming, carbon emission, species loss, deforestation, melting, ocean acidification, and the global waste crisis—make the future of life on earth difficult to imagine. Throughout most of human history, we have relied on models such as generational inheritance or market growth to figure what lies ahead, but if the last few years are any indication, the rhetoric we use to project the future is increasingly insufficient.

French Culture II

Proficiency-based introduction to selected socio-cultural aspects of France with a focus on sustainability-related issues and initiatives in France and the francophone world (green transportation, renewable sources of energy, ecovillages, zero plastic initiatives, social entrepreneurship etc.); incorporates grammar review. Conducted in French.

Energy, Environment, and Policy

This course explores the interplay between energy security, environmental stewardship, and society acceptance. For this reason, it is important to understand the environmental consequences of energy policy choices (and vice versa) as well as the necessity of Community and societal buy-in if sustainability is to be realized. We explore this interplay in the range of policy approaches pursued in various countries, including the United Sates, Japan, China, and the European Union.

Comparative Politics

This course surveys the main theories of comparative politics and introduces the comparative method, a tool for explaining why and how broadly similar polities employ different approaches in seeking to solve common problems. Although we will examine a variety of issues in this course, we will focus intensively on the complex interplay of factors that produces cross-national variation in policy responses to the challenges of sustainable development, which is the theme of Georgia Tech’s current Quality Enhancement Plan.

Technical Communication: Place-making The Ray

This section of LMC3403: Technical Communication is organized around the ideas of community, sustainability, and place-making through an initiative called “The Ray,” a sustainable highway that spans 18 miles along I-85 in West Point and LaGrange, Georgia. The highway currently hosts a solarpowered electric vehicle charging station, a tire safety check station, solar-paved roads, bioswales, right-of-way farming, and pollinator gardens and has plans to expand its sustainable technologies to solar shields, right-of-way solar panels, drones, and more.

Advanced Russian: Mediating Russian Culture

This is a content oriented language course that investigates current topic under discussion across Russian culture and media. We will consider Russia’s place in a globalizing world and how its imperial and Soviet pasts and geography shape its current development, addressing problems of gender and social equality and environmental issues in particular. As we do so, we will cover the major components of the first semester of the third-year Russian language curriculum.

Tech and Environment

This course examines global environmental history from prehistory to the present.

Introduction to Global Development

This course introduces students to the history, theory and practice of international development. Students will examine the different meanings and objectives of global development, paying particular attention to economic growth, poverty alleviation, inequality reduction, capability enhancement, the defense of human rights and sustainability.

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