College of Sciences

Climate and Global Change

Climate change is among the greatest challenges facing humanity today. The course breaks down the scientific underpinnings of how increasing atmospheric greenhouse gases affect the global climate. By looking at the problem of climate change from multiple angles, students get a decent view of how a modern climate scientist works. The course also addresses the impacts of climate change and discusses the pros and cons of potential solutions.

Data Science in Conservation

Conservation approaches have now entered the age of databases, remotely sensed data, computational modeling, and datasets based on long term monitoring. The culmination of these rich data sources is a series of fascinating papers that mine these data to address compelling, big-picture questions about how species, communities, and ecosystems respond to environmental and anthropogenic changes. These studies provide the resources to guide conservation decisions and policies with insight and deliberation.

Ecology

Ecology is a flipped course where students work on applied problems, including those associated with climate change, invasive species, overexploitation etc. The focus is on the ecological concepts, looking at either sustainability or community, with reference to the other, through units, labs, assignments, and activities. 

Earth Processes

NOTE: The Summer 2020 course will be offered online only.

Bioethics

Students will not only learn about the ethical dilemmas in our community, but develop measures and actions to alleviate such. They could make a lasting impact on the community and learn the values of life long service.

Ecology

Ecology is a flipped course where students work on applied problems, including those associated with climate change, invasive species, overexploitation etc. The focus is on the ecological concepts, looking at either sustainability or community, with reference to the other, through units, labs, assignments, and activities. 

Biological Principles

This active learning course is designed to have students work on applied problems, including those associated with climate change and human health, by applying the fundamentals of biology. The course has historically engaged in partnerships with Atlanta biologists, most notably those at Atlanta Audubon to monitor the public health and ecological implications of bird strikes in Atlanta. Note: this lecture course has a co-requisite, previously affiliated service-learning lab.

Intro to Research

This course was created to give students the tools and skills necessary to participate in research as an integral component in their undergraduate experience. This course will explore research ethics (satisfying the research ethics requirements for funding through the NSF, NIH or PURA awards), scientific literacy (finding, reading, and writing research papers), and research careers. The course makes frequent use of case studies and discussions and considers the impact of research and industry on communities.

Sea Level Rise and Coastal Engineering

This course will cover a survey of the modern science of sea level rise and engineering adaptation to ongoing sea level rise. In the first half of the course, students will learn about the Earth system processes which drive sea level rise in Earth’s past and in recent years, and how these processes may change in the future. Students will do a data-driven project exploring historical records of sea level change and variability at individual locations, including a deep dive into the local factors which have driven changes in local sea level.

Ecology

Ecology is a flipped course where students work on applied problems, including those associated with climate change, invasive species, overexploitation etc. The focus is on the ecological concepts, looking at either sustainability or community, with reference to the other, through units, labs, assignments, and activities. 

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