College of Sciences

Earth Processes

This class is designed to familiarize students with the fundamental principles of earth science and how these principles relate to “real world” problems and applied science. The interrelationships between plate tectonics, rock and mineral types, geologic structures and hazards, and natural resources such as ground and surface water are emphasized.

Bioethics

Students will not only learn about the ethical dilemmas in our community, but develop measures and actions to alleviate such. They could make a lasting impact on the community and learn the values of life long service.

Ecology

Ecology is a flipped course where students work on applied problems, including those associated with climate change, invasive species, overexploitation etc. The focus is on the ecological concepts, looking at either sustainability or community, with reference to the other, through units, labs, assignments, and activities. 

Biological Principles

This active learning course is designed to have students work on applied problems, including those associated with climate change and human health, by applying the fundamentals of biology. The course has historically engaged in partnerships with Atlanta biologists, most notably those at Atlanta Audubon to monitor the public health and ecological implications of bird strikes in Atlanta. Note: this lecture course has a co-requisite, previously affiliated service-learning lab.

Intro to Research

This course was created to give students the tools and skills necessary to participate in research as an integral component in their undergraduate experience. This course will explore research ethics (satisfying the research ethics requirements for funding through the NSF, NIH or PURA awards), scientific literacy (finding, reading, and writing research papers), and research careers. The course makes frequent use of case studies and discussions and considers the impact of research and industry on communities.

Sea Level Rise and Coastal Engineering

This course will cover a survey of the modern science of sea level rise and engineering adaptation to ongoing sea level rise. In the first half of the course, students will learn about the Earth system processes which drive sea level rise in Earth’s past and in recent years, and how these processes may change in the future. Students will do a data-driven project exploring historical records of sea level change and variability at individual locations, including a deep dive into the local factors which have driven changes in local sea level.

Ecology

Ecology is a flipped course where students work on applied problems, including those associated with climate change, invasive species, overexploitation etc. The focus is on the ecological concepts, looking at either sustainability or community, with reference to the other, through units, labs, assignments, and activities. 

Extreme Atlanta: Climate Change in Urban Spaces

In this unique project-based interdisciplinary course, students will be exposed to local problems within the greater Atlanta, GA region tied to global climate change. Students will investigate local impacts in the context of atmospheric, hydrological and land processes on the city, including a detailed look at the biological impacts to organisms in this region (including humans)!

Nature, Governance, and Sustainability in Costa Rica

This study abroad program will provide a unique opportunity for students to learn and live in the tropics of Central America. Students will take two classes, BIOL 4813 Tropical Biology & Sustainability and PHIL 3127 Science, Technology, and Human Values, that will introduce students to biological, governmental, and societal interactions that help communities protect natural resources, preserve biological diversity, support local innovation, strengthen societal ties, and bolster human capital.

Climate Resilience

The rapid change in climates across the globe requires us to determine which human and ecological systems will be most affected and how to alleviate climate vulnerability, which is captured by the concept climate resilience. While past studies have largely focused on climate resilience through the lens of either ecological or social systems, there is great potential in quantifying and optimizing climate resilience through the study of integrated social-ecological systems. Social, agricultural, and ecological systems are spatially and functionally integrated.

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