College of Design

Health, Community & Universal Design: A Focus on Neighborhood Farmers Markets

Universal Design in the Built Environment is a project-based, 3-credit course that explores the implications of human ability on the usability of places, products, interfaces, and systems for all individuals.  Course projects will engage students in solving real world problems through community-driven partnerships with the Georgia Farmers Markets Association and local markets.  Using a universal design approach, students will learn how to design for social impact and community health through a focus on local farmer's markets as a locus for social engagement, activity, and good

The Connell Workshop: The Art of Drawing

The workshop explores a wide range of issues in hand drawing - tone, line, contour, gesture, composition, and the humanistic forces that shape them. The great Renaissance masters, Raphael, Michelangelo, da Vinci and others are used as a research standard for this investigation. Throughout the term we invite guest artists, scientists, life drawing models, and philosophers to participate in the discussion. All these disciplines form the intellectual basis for understanding the world that we inhabit and therefore, the world that we must preserve.

Green Infrastructure and Sustainable Communities

Workshop focused course on stormwater management, green infrastructure, and sustainable development.

Residential Design and Construction

The course will move students through the design and construction of a single-family home. We'll work within the constraints a local non-profit developer. The process will move from the due diligence of lot selection and determining the best use for a lot within the guidelines of an organization moving renters to home ownership. Once a legal footprint is established, a home will be designed to include plans, elevations, structural components, and a sustainability plan based on EarthCraft certification. Project presentations will be delivered to the executive team of the non-profit.

History of Urban Form

Understanding cities, the largest and most complex artifacts in human history, is essential as we face the challenges of building a sustainable future. This course is taught from historical vantage points across the globe, recognizing that urban form is shaped by many influences - ecological, technological, cultural, political and economic.

Sustainable Cities Studio

The studio is a practicum for students in their final year of the sustainable cities minor, bringing students from various majors to begin to apply their specialized knowledge in ways that interact to provide planning, design, and development approaches to the critical problem of linking transportation, land use, urban design, housing, and the environment together in framing sustainability policies.

Introduction to Urban and Regional Planning

This course provides an overview of the planning of cities and metropolitan regions. The legal and historical context as well as substantive areas of urban planning
are addressed. Tensions among economic, environmental and equity results of public policies and private developments are examined. Tools for involving
stakeholders in planning decisions are surveyed.

Curating Safe Space: LIVE WORK LEARN PLAY GROW

In partnership with The Pride School Atlanta, this course explores advocacy through the design of space at three scales of architecture (in this case, as the design of building): interior space, the building, and the landscape. Can architects re-imagine the future of educational spaces and social equity by placing attention to the bidirectional relationships of space and behavior within the context of gender equality and human rights? Can advocacy become a mainstream practice, a political voice, for architects?

Prototyping Practices for Innovation

Prototypes are typically thought of as nearly complete products or technologies which are used to conduct system, alpha or beta testing near the end of a development process. This course is designed to expand on the idea of prototyping and teach how to employ a variety of tools as methods to inspire, contextualize, evaluate and inform any phase of any research or development activity.

Architecture Design Studio I

In partnership with The Pride School Atlanta, this course explores advocacy through the design of space at three scales of architecture (in this case, as the design of building): interior space, the building, and the landscape. Can architects re-imagine the future of educational spaces and social equity by placing attention to the bidirectional relationships of space and behavior within the context of gender equality and human rights? Can advocacy become a mainstream practice, a political voice, for architects?

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