College of Computing

Global Entrepreneurship

In this course, you will be a part of an international team, with students spanning our Atlanta, GT Shenzhen, and GT Lorraine campuses. Your global team will work to innovate customer segments and new solutions to some of the thorniest global challenges as framed by the UN SDGs. Each team will choose a goal (or goals) and set of relevant targets and indicators to focus their work on. This course will provide you with real-world, hands-on learning on what it’s like to create a global startup focused on a grand challenge.

Foundations of Human Computer Interaction

The theme of the course this year is sustainability. The course, however, is limited to first year MS-HCI students.

Information and Communication Technologies and Development

This course focuses on information and communication technology (ICT) design, adoption, and use as seen through the lens of global development. We will begin with studying the history of technological advancement, the global development discourse (from the 1940s to the present era), poverty as experienced, before we engage with the design thinking process. We will then shift our gaze to particular domains of global development, discuss important questions and concerns in these areas of work in the present day, before asking what all this means for us as local and global citizens.

Junior Design (Part 1): Project Design and Technical Communication Strategies

This course is part 1 of a two-semester Junior Design capstone course sequence that includes a computer science and technical communication component. This semester teams will develop a software solution to a problem defined by a real-world client. The semester culminates in the development of a prototype and its demonstration in a formal presentation. Supporting deliverables that teams create include a project vision statement, user stories, and a usability/design support document.

User Interface Design

This project-based course covers the process of designing high-quality user interfaces to computing systems. It walks teams step-by-step through the user-centered design process, resulting in novel UI designs that meet users' needs and even delight them. The class covers theories informing UI design and evaluation, reviews the state of the art in interaction and presentation techniques, including user input techniques and the state of the art in graphical, audio, and haptic feedback.

Vertically Integrated Project: Civic Data and Design

The purpose of this course is to research and develop information, communication, and media systems to address regional civic issues, using techniques from design, computing, and social sciences, in collaboration with government and community partners.  These systems will have real-world impact, and promote social sustainability, equity, and justice.

Intro to Educational Tech/Educational Tech Theoretical Foundations

In this course we will use theories on learning and design to develop educational technology that facilitates learning about smart cities and sustainable communities.  Students will learn about the value of understanding audiences, theory, and design methods in creating effective educational technology, in the context of teaching the public about how smart cities could impact their lives.

Technology and Poverty

This course encourages students to think about how they might design technologies with a focus on global development, paying special attention to the needs of underserved, under-resourced, and under-represented communities across the world.

Intro to Database Systems

A project-based database course offered within the college of computing. Using data from an existing serve, learn, sustain project we'll design a relational database to help analyze and query that data to help find solutions. We introduce the fundamental concepts necessary for the design and use of modern database systems in today’s large scale enterprise applications. We examine the concepts in the order that we typically encounter them in the actual database design process. We start with the problem of conceptually representing data that is to be stored in a database.

Research Methods for Human Computer Interaction

How do you know what a user wants to see on a wearable display, whether an app feature is being used, whether a clickable button is better than a swipe, or whether a person who is blind can use your physical product? Research methods for HCI allow you to investigate such questions and develop evidence to inform design decisions. In this course, you will learn about common methods employed in user-centered and evidence-based design. You will also learn how to choose methods, plan studies, and perform research that is inclusive of users with a range of abilities.

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