Valuing Community Impact

Valuing Community Impact

To value community impact means that research, courses, and service projects begin with recognition of actual existing problems or concerns and are designed with the intention of a making an improvement in specific areas of human need. This concept assumes that community input happens at the forefront of project design for the purpose of co-creating desired outcomes.

Policy, Trends, and Ethics in Real Estate Development

Through experiential learning, students of this course will understand sustainability in the built environment and within a community. They will witness the connection between service and profitability as related to property management that helps eliminate transiency which has proven to be a primary contributor to failing public schools. Teams within the class will be assigned real world deliverable that will assist with the mission of the partnered nonprofit.

Imagining the City

In this first year writing and communication course you will consider how your work at Tech and after Tech may interact with and affect urban communities and the people who live in them. We will begin by examining our own backgrounds--whether you're a life long city dweller or whether you grew up in a rural or suburban area--and how they have shaped our attitudes toward Atlanta and toward cities generally. These backgrounds, we will see, may condition our attitudes toward the development of urban space.

Intro to Social Justice

Gentrification—the economic and cultural “revitalization” of American cities--has been, for better or worse, the defining feature of urban life in the twentyfirst century. As late as the 1990s, the “inner city” was portrayed in journalism and popular culture as a decaying, crime-ridden ghetto; now it is often seen as a booming, culturally vibrant, economically desirable playground for hipsters and creatives—at least those who can afford it. How did this happen? Is it good or bad?

Project Studio: Technology

The Undergraduate Project Studio course offered by the School of Music in Spring 2019 presents the fundamentals of digital signal processing (DSP) as it relates to both physiological signals and musical sound. Students participate in hands-on lab sessions using EEG, ECG, EDA and other body sensors, as well as lecturediscussions of music and writings by composers and researchers who use this data in their work. Students complete weekly lab assignments and reading reflections, in addition developing a design project in small groups.

Technical Communication for Business Majors

After completing the first course module on personal branding, students will turn their attention to climate-related issues. Working in conjunction with several programs and initiatives both on and off campus, students will consider how climate-related issues affect us both as individuals and employees. For the second course module, students will select a Georgia-based company within the industry they hope to enter, or within which they are already working.

Graphic Medicine: Comics and Mental Illness

Students will have the opportunity to share research about mental health issues by creating digital comics that reduce the stigma surrounding mental illness and that educate the Georgia Tech community about mental health resources on campus.

Sustainable Cities Studio

In this course, we partner with Central Atlanta Progress, who recently completed the Downtown Atlanta Master Plan (https://www.atlantadowntown.com/initiatives/master-plan), focusing specifically on the goals outlined in chapter 5 regarding restoration of the urban forest downtown and enhancing green infrastructure. Students will break into disciplinary teams to accomplish two goals: 1. Compile or create evidence to support the planning goals and their outcomes outlined in chapter 5, and 2. Identify opportunities and implementation strategies to enhance green infrastructure downtown.

Principles of Interaction Design

In this course we will study and explore the principles and practices of interaction design. You will be introduced to a number of different techniques and tools for understanding particular interaction design challenges, you will develop scenarios and storyboards, create low-fidelity prototypes, and iterate on those prototypes to create a final design project.

GT 1000 SU2

This GT 1000 course is focused on Equitable & Sustainable Development as part of the Sustainable Communities summer session track.  Student will learn to evaluate how decisions impact the sustainability of communities.

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