Understanding Local History and Context

Understanding Local History and Context

The #Charlestonsyllabus and the #Lemonadesyllabus are just two of many recent collections of history, theory, and literature that provide a historical context and intellectual framework for current social and cultural events ranging from the Charleston church shooting to Beyoncé’s visual album Lemonade.

Sustainability in American Literary Regionalism

In this section of English 1102, students will read and analyze novels, short stories, and movies grouped together under the genre of American literary regionalism. These texts, created between 1880 and 1950, are concerned with American small towns and rural areas, agriculture and farming science, and community health and development. We will investigate how an earlier generation of writers represented concepts of sustainability and equitability, and how these representations compare to modern-day writing on the same topics.

Imagining the City

In this first year writing and communication course you will consider how your work at Tech and after Tech may interact with and affect urban communities and the people who live in them. We will begin by examining our own backgrounds--whether you're a life long city dweller or whether you grew up in a rural or suburban area--and how they have shaped our attitudes toward Atlanta and toward cities generally. These backgrounds, we will see, may condition our attitudes toward the development of urban space.

Rhetoric and Poetics of Food Communities

This course is a service learning course focused on the interaction of communication and narrative in social justice (and specifically social justice in food and community). This course uses the living-learning opportunity to foster community engagement within the GATech Community. This course encourages students to learn the story of social justice in Atlanta and the south through its food history, and ask  bigger questions of its food futures. This course pairs with community engaged partners to pursue SLS Big Ideas, and community health partnerships.

Technical Communication for Business Majors

After completing the first course module on personal branding, students will turn their attention to climate-related issues. Working in conjunction with several programs and initiatives both on and off campus, students will consider how climate-related issues affect us both as individuals and employees. For the second course module, students will select a Georgia-based company within the industry they hope to enter, or within which they are already working.

Graphic Medicine: Comics and Mental Illness

Students will have the opportunity to share research about mental health issues by creating digital comics that reduce the stigma surrounding mental illness and that educate the Georgia Tech community about mental health resources on campus.

Urban and Regional Economics

In Urban Economics, Atlanta is an interesting city. It is one of the most segregated cities ethnically and economically. It is one of the most sprawled cities in the US. The unique features affect your life. Atlanta shows very low inter-generational income mobility. Drivers spend so much time stuck in traffic. We study urban economic theory to explain how the city characteristics affect your life.

Poetics of Sustainability: Ecology & Immigration

This course will explore the intersections of ecology and immigration as urgent social, political, and environmental issues through the lens of poetry.

Food Literacy of Atlanta

In the past decade Atlanta has undergone phenomenal changes in infrastructure, and food culture because of two things: being a beta-hub in the tech industry, and tax credits that have cultivated a thriving film industry. This influx of people, money, and innovation, restaurant culture has seen tremendous growth. This Serve-Learn-Sustain (SLS) course encourages students to learn the story of Atlanta through its food history.

Curating Safe Space: LIVE WORK LEARN PLAY GROW

In partnership with The Pride School Atlanta, this course explores advocacy through the design of space at three scales of architecture (in this case, as the design of building): interior space, the building, and the landscape. Can architects re-imagine the future of educational spaces and social equity by placing attention to the bidirectional relationships of space and behavior within the context of gender equality and human rights? Can advocacy become a mainstream practice, a political voice, for architects?

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