Prototyping

Prototyping

Prototyping is the activity of creating partial models of an artifact or system. It is foundational to design and engineering. There are three features of prototyping: 1) the models are incomplete 2) the models are used for communicating or testing ideas 3) the process is iterative, lessons learned from a prototype are implemented in the next prototype, gradually increasing the fidelity of the model.

Project Studio: Technology

The Undergraduate Project Studio course offered by the School of Music in Spring 2019 presents the fundamentals of digital signal processing (DSP) as it relates to both physiological signals and musical sound. Students participate in hands-on lab sessions using EEG, ECG, EDA and other body sensors, as well as lecturediscussions of music and writings by composers and researchers who use this data in their work. Students complete weekly lab assignments and reading reflections, in addition developing a design project in small groups.

User Interface Design

This project-based course covers the process of designing high-quality user interfaces to computing systems. It walks teams step-by-step through the user-centered design process, resulting in novel UI designs that meet users' needs and even delight them. The class covers theories informing UI design and evaluation, reviews the state of the art in interaction and presentation techniques, including user input techniques and the state of the art in graphical, audio, and haptic feedback.

Project Studio (Local Data Design Lab)

This course seeks to engage graduate students (and advanced undergraduates) from across Georgia Tech in exploring what Atlanta looks like through civic data. Today, data on the city are increasingly available. Micro and macro changes in the makeup of local neighborhoods can be tracked through demolition/construction permits, tax records, and community surveys, among other sources; all of which might be easily downloaded by anyone with an internet connection. But data can be available, without necessarily being accessible or actionable.

Health, Community & Universal Design: A Focus on Neighborhood Farmers Markets

Universal Design in the Built Environment is a project-based, 3-credit course that explores the implications of human ability on the usability of places, products, interfaces, and systems for all individuals.  Course projects will engage students in solving real world problems through community-driven partnerships with the Georgia Farmers Markets Association and local markets.  Using a universal design approach, students will learn how to design for social impact and community health through a focus on local farmer's markets as a locus for social engagement, activity, and good

Prototyping Practices for Innovation

Prototypes are typically thought of as nearly complete products or technologies which are used to conduct system, alpha or beta testing near the end of a development process. This course is designed to expand on the idea of prototyping and teach how to employ a variety of tools as methods to inspire, contextualize, evaluate and inform any phase of any research or development activity.

Vertically Integrated Project: Civic Data and Design

The purpose of this course is to research and develop information, communication, and media systems to address regional civic issues, using techniques from design, computing, and social sciences, in collaboration with government and community partners.  These systems will have real-world impact, and promote social sustainability, equity, and justice.

Psychology Research Methods for HCI

How do you know what a user wants to see on a wearable display, whether an app feature is being used, whether a clickable button is better than a swipe, or whether a person who is blind can use your physical product? Research methods for HCI allow you to investigate such questions and develop evidence to inform design decisions. In this course, you will learn about common methods employed in user-centered and evidence-based design. You will also learn how to choose methods, plan studies, and perform research that is inclusive of users with a range of abilities. 

SLS Case Study: Maker Culture and Sustainable Transportation (GT Mechanical Engineering)

While recycling is a time-honored tradition of the environmentally-conscious, an equally powerful way to build sustainable communities is by learning to reuse and repair damaged materials. Maker culture, a version of DIY culture that delights in creation and repair, offers a model for sustainability. In this case study, follow the adventures of GT student Buzz as he sets out to repair his bike using two Georgia Tech Maker Spaces: The Starter Bikes bike repair cooperative, and the Invention Studio. By learning how to restore his bike, Buzz empowers himself to live a sustainable life in another important way: as a bike commuter. Read on to consider the intersections of maker culture and sustainable transportation.

This tool was contributed by Arkadeep Kumar, Bob Myers, and Bethany Jacobs.

Urban Farming & Community Gardens

Starting a community garden in an abandoned vacant lot is a good way to address blight in a neighborhood. This project builds on the dataset of Westside Atlanta property surveys and walks the students through the process of starting a community garden to selling its produce on farmers markets. It emphasizes the social aspect of community building and the importance of buying local.

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