Inequality, Poverty and Sustainable Development

Sustainability, Technology, and Policy

This course - taught on the Pacific Program - will develop a theoretical understanding of sustainability, from a bottom-up perspective that considers ecological outcomes as a function of human institutions. It begins with defining and understanding the tragedy of the commons, and develops an understanding of why we might not be doomed to this tragedy. While exploring broad themes in environmental ethics, philosophy, and management, it will explore cases in the Pacific context, and will include a service-learning project in Fiji.

Social Issues and Public Policy

This course focuses on social issues associated with contemporary American society. While the United States has many benefits and is a nation that many admire, there are several social problems that are misaligned with American values. More specifically, it takes a critical sociological perspective in analyzing U.S. capitalism and its impact on our social institutions, social inequalities, and the quality of our democracy. We particularly focus on comparisons of the U.S. with other affluent, market-based democratic countries in order to understand the uniqueness of American capitalism.

Introduction to Global Development

This course introduces students to the history, theory and practice of international development. Students will examine the different meanings and objectives of global development, paying particular attention to economic growth, poverty alleviation, inequality reduction, capability enhancement, the defense of human rights and sustainability.

Introduction to Global Development

This course introduces students to the history, theory and practice of international development. Students will examine the different meanings and objectives of global development, paying particular attention to economic growth, poverty alleviation, inequality reduction, capability enhancement, the defense of human rights and sustainability.

Class, Power, and Inequality

In Class, Power, and Inequality, students will explore the causes and consequences of economic inequality in the United States and abroad. In particular, this course will help students understand why inequality between individuals and communities occurs, with major focuses on changes in the economy and social forces like politics, culture, and religion. Further, we pay particular attention to how gender and race/ethnicity shape economic inequality.

Development Economics

This is a graduate course on development economics. The course will cover a wide range of topics including how communities differ in terms of: economic growth, poverty, inequality, and human development. The course will help students understand what do we mean by sustainable development, what are the problems in achieving it and how can we overcome those problems.

Honors Biological Principles

The laboratory portions of the BIOL 1511 and 1521 courses are designed as research service-learning labs that integrate relevant community service with academic coursework to enhance learning, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities. In partnership with the Atlanta Botanical Gardens (BIOL 1511) and the Piedmont Park Conservancy (BIOL 1521), students conduct research that benefits learning in biology and the greater Atlanta community.

Organizational Behavior

Organizational behavior (OB) is an interdisciplinary field that seeks to understand human behavior within organizations. It imports, integrates, and expands upon theory and research from areas such as psychology, sociology, economics, political science, anthropology, and communication. It places an emphasis on putting what we have learned from these fields into the context of the workplace.

Documentary Film

 Documentaries help shed light on significant topics, and challenge their audiences to act on relevant issues of the day.  The objectives of this course are to introduce students to the art of documentary filmmaking, and to explore the ways in which documentary filmmaking can serve as a catalyst for articulating social justice issues that prompt audiences to take action.

Global Development Minor Capstone Course

My course encourages students to think about how they might study or design technologies with a focus on UN Sustainable Development Goals objectives, paying special attention to the needs of underserved, under-resourced, and under-represented communities across the world.

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