Inequality, Poverty and Sustainable Development

Inequality, Poverty and Sustainable Development

In September 2015, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development was adopted at the United Nations Sustainable Development Summit. This Agenda is a plan of action for people, planet and prosperity. It recognizes that eradicating poverty in all its forms and dimensions, including extreme poverty, is the greatest global challenge and an indispensable requirement for sustainable development.

Public Health Analytics

The socioecological model of public health clearly establishes the importance of physical and social environments in building healthy, sustainable communities and influencing population health. This research paradigm is firmly embedded in the idea that the health status of an individual is simultaneously produced by individual biology and their surrounding physical, social, cultural and political context.

Imagining the City

In this first year writing and communication course you will consider how your work at Tech and after Tech may interact with and affect urban communities and the people who live in them. We will begin by examining our own backgrounds--whether you're a life long city dweller or whether you grew up in a rural or suburban area--and how they have shaped our attitudes toward Atlanta and toward cities generally. These backgrounds, we will see, may condition our attitudes toward the development of urban space.

Intro to Sociology

The study of sociology is the study of society, and this introductory course teaches students to see that human communities are more than a collection of individuals, self-determined and self-directing. The course examines structural inequalities, cultural conditions, and social institutions that pattern and shape human behavior. First, students learn that the world around them is not "natural" but rather conditional, and human behavior is not "innate," but mutable through socialization.

Back to the Future

Sustainability initiatives, from green development to alternative energy projects, aim to fulfill the needs of the present without sacrificing the well-being of the future. In collaboration with Serve-Learn-Sustain, this class investigates the history and meaning of the of the future through popular media, early modern literature, and sustainable development inititives in Atlanta in order to better understand what lies ahead.

The Poetics of Sustainability: Race and the Environment

Utilizing our WOVEN curriculum, this course will explore the intersections of race and the environment as urgent social, political, and ecological issues through the lens of poetry.

Cultures of Waste: Disease and Environment

This course explores literary and cultural representations of bodily and industrial waste alongside wasting diseases to explore how the nineteenth century produced ideas about waste that continue to influence contemporary work in the fields of epidemiology, civil engineering, public health, environmental science, and medicine.

Project Studio (Local Data Design Lab)

This course seeks to engage graduate students (and advanced undergraduates) from across Georgia Tech in exploring what Atlanta looks like through civic data. Today, data on the city are increasingly available. Micro and macro changes in the makeup of local neighborhoods can be tracked through demolition/construction permits, tax records, and community surveys, among other sources; all of which might be easily downloaded by anyone with an internet connection. But data can be available, without necessarily being accessible or actionable.

Urban and Regional Economics

In Urban Economics, Atlanta is an interesting city. It is one of the most segregated cities ethnically and economically. It is one of the most sprawled cities in the US. The unique features affect your life. Atlanta shows very low inter-generational income mobility. Drivers spend so much time stuck in traffic. We study urban economic theory to explain how the city characteristics affect your life.

Technical Communication: The Problem of Water

The technical communication classroom is not just a laboratory space for professional training; it is also a laboratory space for developing the necessary skills to become a responsible citizen (Blake Scott 294). This summer’s experiences should transform you into a more effective communicator who is more aware of the ways that technical communication can be used in both the workplace and the community as a whole. Technical Communication involves working with a variety of stakeholders to utilize and relay information in multiple forms.

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