Inequality, Poverty and Sustainable Development

Inequality, Poverty and Sustainable Development

In September 2015, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development was adopted at the United Nations Sustainable Development Summit. This Agenda is a plan of action for people, planet and prosperity. It recognizes that eradicating poverty in all its forms and dimensions, including extreme poverty, is the greatest global challenge and an indispensable requirement for sustainable development.

Public Health Analytics

The socioecological model of public health clearly establishes the importance of physical and social environments in building healthy, sustainable communities and influencing population health. This research paradigm is firmly embedded in the idea that the health status of an individual is simultaneously produced by individual biology and their surrounding physical, social, cultural and political context.

Policy, Trends, and Ethics in Real Estate Development

Through experiential learning, students of this course will understand sustainability in the built environment and within a community. They will witness the connection between service and profitability as related to property management that helps eliminate transiency which has proven to be a primary contributor to failing public schools. Teams within the class will be assigned real world deliverable that will assist with the mission of the partnered nonprofit.

Imagining the City

In this first year writing and communication course you will consider how your work at Tech and after Tech may interact with and affect urban communities and the people who live in them. We will begin by examining our own backgrounds--whether you're a life long city dweller or whether you grew up in a rural or suburban area--and how they have shaped our attitudes toward Atlanta and toward cities generally. These backgrounds, we will see, may condition our attitudes toward the development of urban space.

Rhetoric and Poetics of Food Communities

This course is a service learning course focused on the interaction of communication and narrative in social justice (and specifically social justice in food and community). This course uses the living-learning opportunity to foster community engagement within the GATech Community. This course encourages students to learn the story of social justice in Atlanta and the south through its food history, and ask  bigger questions of its food futures. This course pairs with community engaged partners to pursue SLS Big Ideas, and community health partnerships.

Intro to Sociology

The study of sociology is the study of society, and this introductory course teaches students to see that human communities are more than a collection of individuals, self-determined and self-directing. The course examines structural inequalities, cultural conditions, and social institutions that pattern and shape human behavior. First, students learn that the world around them is not "natural" but rather conditional, and human behavior is not "innate," but mutable through socialization.

Intro to Social Justice

Gentrification—the economic and cultural “revitalization” of American cities--has been, for better or worse, the defining feature of urban life in the twentyfirst century. As late as the 1990s, the “inner city” was portrayed in journalism and popular culture as a decaying, crime-ridden ghetto; now it is often seen as a booming, culturally vibrant, economically desirable playground for hipsters and creatives—at least those who can afford it. How did this happen? Is it good or bad?

Back to the Future

Sustainability initiatives, from green development to alternative energy projects, aim to fulfill the needs of the present without sacrificing the well-being of the future. In collaboration with Serve-Learn-Sustain, this class investigates the history and meaning of the of the future through popular media, early modern literature, and sustainable development inititives in Atlanta in order to better understand what lies ahead.

The Poetics of Sustainability: Race and the Environment

Utilizing our WOVEN curriculum, this course will explore the intersections of race and the environment as urgent social, political, and ecological issues through the lens of poetry.

Cultures of Waste: Disease and Environment

This course explores literary and cultural representations of bodily and industrial waste alongside wasting diseases to explore how the nineteenth century produced ideas about waste that continue to influence contemporary work in the fields of epidemiology, civil engineering, public health, environmental science, and medicine.

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