Doing Good in Your Neighborhood

Doing Good in Your Neighborhood

An analytical view of the national landscape suggests that in the midst of urban crises, colleges and universities face three basic choices: exit, voice, and loyalty. With exit, the goal is to eliminate challenges within and near campus borders, establishing an insulated environment.

Sustainability in American Literary Regionalism

In this section of English 1102, students will read and analyze novels, short stories, and movies grouped together under the genre of American literary regionalism. These texts, created between 1880 and 1950, are concerned with American small towns and rural areas, agriculture and farming science, and community health and development. We will investigate how an earlier generation of writers represented concepts of sustainability and equitability, and how these representations compare to modern-day writing on the same topics.

Project Studio: Technology

The Undergraduate Project Studio course offered by the School of Music in Spring 2019 presents the fundamentals of digital signal processing (DSP) as it relates to both physiological signals and musical sound. Students participate in hands-on lab sessions using EEG, ECG, EDA and other body sensors, as well as lecturediscussions of music and writings by composers and researchers who use this data in their work. Students complete weekly lab assignments and reading reflections, in addition developing a design project in small groups.

Graphic Medicine: Comics and Mental Illness

Students will have the opportunity to share research about mental health issues by creating digital comics that reduce the stigma surrounding mental illness and that educate the Georgia Tech community about mental health resources on campus.

Composing Access

Who has access to the university? In this course, you will consider how institutes of higher education have built barriers to access for disabled people and how disabled people have fought to remove them. Using Georgia Tech’s WOVEN curriculum, you will produce four artifacts aimed at identifying, discussing, and addressing many of those barriers at Georgia Tech. In so doing, you will develop skills in communication, rhetoric, and communication that will give you access to the conversations and work happening across the campus.

Health, Community & Universal Design: A Focus on Neighborhood Farmers Markets

Universal Design in the Built Environment is a project-based, 3-credit course that explores the implications of human ability on the usability of places, products, interfaces, and systems for all individuals.  Course projects will engage students in solving real world problems through community-driven partnerships with the Georgia Farmers Markets Association and local markets.  Using a universal design approach, students will learn how to design for social impact and community health through a focus on local farmer's markets as a locus for social engagement, activity, and good

Urban and Regional Economics

In Urban Economics, Atlanta is an interesting city. It is one of the most segregated cities ethnically and economically. It is one of the most sprawled cities in the US. The unique features affect your life. Atlanta shows very low inter-generational income mobility. Drivers spend so much time stuck in traffic. We study urban economic theory to explain how the city characteristics affect your life.

Technical Communication: The Problem of Water

The technical communication classroom is not just a laboratory space for professional training; it is also a laboratory space for developing the necessary skills to become a responsible citizen (Blake Scott 294). This summer’s experiences should transform you into a more effective communicator who is more aware of the ways that technical communication can be used in both the workplace and the community as a whole. Technical Communication involves working with a variety of stakeholders to utilize and relay information in multiple forms.

Poetics of Sustainability: Ecology & Immigration

This course will explore the intersections of ecology and immigration as urgent social, political, and environmental issues through the lens of poetry.

Food Literacy of Atlanta

In the past decade Atlanta has undergone phenomenal changes in infrastructure, and food culture because of two things: being a beta-hub in the tech industry, and tax credits that have cultivated a thriving film industry. This influx of people, money, and innovation, restaurant culture has seen tremendous growth. This Serve-Learn-Sustain (SLS) course encourages students to learn the story of Atlanta through its food history.

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