Collaborative Problem-Solving

Collaborative Problem-Solving

Collaborative problem-solving (CPS) simply means that multiple stakeholders agree to work together to address community concerns. The CPS model provides a systematic approach for communities to build partnerships with other stakeholders as they address their challenges.

Sustainability in American Literary Regionalism

In this section of English 1102, students will read and analyze novels, short stories, and movies grouped together under the genre of American literary regionalism. These texts, created between 1880 and 1950, are concerned with American small towns and rural areas, agriculture and farming science, and community health and development. We will investigate how an earlier generation of writers represented concepts of sustainability and equitability, and how these representations compare to modern-day writing on the same topics.

Policy, Trends, and Ethics in Real Estate Development

Through experiential learning, students of this course will understand sustainability in the built environment and within a community. They will witness the connection between service and profitability as related to property management that helps eliminate transiency which has proven to be a primary contributor to failing public schools. Teams within the class will be assigned real world deliverable that will assist with the mission of the partnered nonprofit.

Rhetoric and Poetics of Food Communities

This course is a service learning course focused on the interaction of communication and narrative in social justice (and specifically social justice in food and community). This course uses the living-learning opportunity to foster community engagement within the GATech Community. This course encourages students to learn the story of social justice in Atlanta and the south through its food history, and ask  bigger questions of its food futures. This course pairs with community engaged partners to pursue SLS Big Ideas, and community health partnerships.

Intro to Social Justice

Gentrification—the economic and cultural “revitalization” of American cities--has been, for better or worse, the defining feature of urban life in the twentyfirst century. As late as the 1990s, the “inner city” was portrayed in journalism and popular culture as a decaying, crime-ridden ghetto; now it is often seen as a booming, culturally vibrant, economically desirable playground for hipsters and creatives—at least those who can afford it. How did this happen? Is it good or bad?

Biorefining

Biomass is the only renewable source of organic carbon. Many efforts have been made in recent year to develop economically viable processes for converting biomass into novel products like fuels, chemicals, and materials. Examples of products include ethanol and alkanes as biofuels, bulk chemicals like ethylene glycol and phenol, and composite materials containing biomass-derived fibers. However, the complexity of the feedstock and required process conditions have presented significant challenges for many applications.

Project Studio: Technology

The Undergraduate Project Studio course offered by the School of Music in Spring 2019 presents the fundamentals of digital signal processing (DSP) as it relates to both physiological signals and musical sound. Students participate in hands-on lab sessions using EEG, ECG, EDA and other body sensors, as well as lecturediscussions of music and writings by composers and researchers who use this data in their work. Students complete weekly lab assignments and reading reflections, in addition developing a design project in small groups.

Technical Communication for Business Majors

After completing the first course module on personal branding, students will turn their attention to climate-related issues. Working in conjunction with several programs and initiatives both on and off campus, students will consider how climate-related issues affect us both as individuals and employees. For the second course module, students will select a Georgia-based company within the industry they hope to enter, or within which they are already working.

Composing Access

Who has access to the university? In this course, you will consider how institutes of higher education have built barriers to access for disabled people and how disabled people have fought to remove them. Using Georgia Tech’s WOVEN curriculum, you will produce four artifacts aimed at identifying, discussing, and addressing many of those barriers at Georgia Tech. In so doing, you will develop skills in communication, rhetoric, and communication that will give you access to the conversations and work happening across the campus.

User Interface Design

This project-based course covers the process of designing high-quality user interfaces to computing systems. It walks teams step-by-step through the user-centered design process, resulting in novel UI designs that meet users' needs and even delight them. The class covers theories informing UI design and evaluation, reviews the state of the art in interaction and presentation techniques, including user input techniques and the state of the art in graphical, audio, and haptic feedback.

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