Asset-based Community Development

Asset-based Community Development- Community Asset Mapping

(Cross-listing with Community Asset Mapping.) The value of mapping to sustainable communities is that it provides a familiar and concrete form to present meaningful data and orient stakeholders in regards to an issue. It can also be a process undertaken collaboratively with a community — thereby becoming a shared, collective artifact. In Asset Based Community Development, maps are commonly used to collect and present assets.

Courses and supplementary material for this Big Idea are located in the list below.

Asset-based Community Development

Asset-based community development, commonly referred to by practitioners as ABCD, starts by looking at community strengths, or assets, including what communities are already doing well, and uses these as building blocks for change. 

Courses and supplementary material for this Big Idea are located in the list below.

Public Health Analytics

The socioecological model of public health clearly establishes the importance of physical and social environments in building healthy, sustainable communities and influencing population health. This research paradigm is firmly embedded in the idea that the health status of an individual is simultaneously produced by individual biology and their surrounding physical, social, cultural and political context.

Policy, Trends, and Ethics in Real Estate Development

Through experiential learning, students of this course will understand sustainability in the built environment and within a community. They will witness the connection between service and profitability as related to property management that helps eliminate transiency which has proven to be a primary contributor to failing public schools. Teams within the class will be assigned real world deliverable that will assist with the mission of the partnered nonprofit.

Sustainable Cities Studio

In this course, we partner with Central Atlanta Progress, who recently completed the Downtown Atlanta Master Plan (https://www.atlantadowntown.com/initiatives/master-plan), focusing specifically on the goals outlined in chapter 5 regarding restoration of the urban forest downtown and enhancing green infrastructure. Students will break into disciplinary teams to accomplish two goals: 1. Compile or create evidence to support the planning goals and their outcomes outlined in chapter 5, and 2. Identify opportunities and implementation strategies to enhance green infrastructure downtown.

Health, Community & Universal Design: A Focus on Neighborhood Farmers Markets

Universal Design in the Built Environment is a project-based, 3-credit course that explores the implications of human ability on the usability of places, products, interfaces, and systems for all individuals.  Course projects will engage students in solving real world problems through community-driven partnerships with the Georgia Farmers Markets Association and local markets.  Using a universal design approach, students will learn how to design for social impact and community health through a focus on local farmer's markets as a locus for social engagement, activity, and good

Urban and Regional Economics

In Urban Economics, Atlanta is an interesting city. It is one of the most segregated cities ethnically and economically. It is one of the most sprawled cities in the US. The unique features affect your life. Atlanta shows very low inter-generational income mobility. Drivers spend so much time stuck in traffic. We study urban economic theory to explain how the city characteristics affect your life.

Women in Science Fiction

Women in Science Fiction studies women writers, artists, and musicians who use science fiction to propose and debate how we might make our world more sustainable. Engaging topics like race, gender, and the environment, these women craft futures that may sometimes appear fantastical or otherwise out of reach. However, this course asserts the real-world stakes of its subject matter for Georgia Tech students. Our readings will spur discussions and assignments about today’s sustainability challenges. This will include an exciting partnership with Prof.

Food Literacy of Atlanta

In the past decade Atlanta has undergone phenomenal changes in infrastructure, and food culture because of two things: being a beta-hub in the tech industry, and tax credits that have cultivated a thriving film industry. This influx of people, money, and innovation, restaurant culture has seen tremendous growth. This Serve-Learn-Sustain (SLS) course encourages students to learn the story of Atlanta through its food history.

Development Economics

This is a graduate course on development economics. The course will cover a wide range of topics including how communities differ in terms of: economic growth, poverty, inequality, and human development. The course will help students understand what do we mean by sustainable development, what are the problems in achieving it and how can we overcome those problems.

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