College of Liberal Arts

Globalization in Latin America

What is globalization? Is it a series of economic adjustments that has resulted in the integration of systems of production and financial markets at a world scale?Alternatively, is it a variety of biological, environmental, political and cultural phenomena that go beyond state governments and involve a number of transnational actors, such as religious organizations, multinational corporations, NGOs, media, and civil society? Does globalization imply more homogeneity or diversity? What does it mean to live in a globalized world? In what ways do global processes affect our lives?

Nature's Rhetoric

This course explores how local institutions—including businesses, nonprofit organizations, and our own campus—variously advance and challenge received ideas about nature and sustainability. By analyzing the public-facing, multimodal rhetoric of these institutions, we will ask: how suitable are these ideas for a consideration of the complex environmental issues of our present age?

Energy and International Security

This course examines issues at the intersection of national energy security, sustainability, and international conflict and cooperation. Is oil import dependence a foreign policy liability or cause war? Do globalization and the interdependence of energy markets favor international cooperation and peace? More specifically, can Saudi Arabia and Russia use hydrocarbon exports as energy weapons? Alternatively, will low oil prices, as well as the promise of natural gas and future exports lock in a strategic pivot away from the Persian Gulf and reinvigorate U.S.

Sound Poetics x Sound Politics

Building on the multimedia strategies of composition and process students begin to develop in ENGL 1101, this course in multimedia rhetoric examines the influence of sound on experiences of belonging and access in the spaces we occupy and travel through, from the immediate environs of Georgia Tech to public spaces and sites of development throughout Atlanta.  An initial unit builds a vocabulary for recognizing and analyzing sounds in what R.

The Rhetorics and Poetics of Dirt

This course asks students to examine what we talk about when we talk about “dirt,” and how do the things we communicate about dirt change its presence in our lives. The major assignments facilitate learning goals through four units: dirt vs. soil, earthworks, dirt stories, and trendy dirt. The primary texts in this course will largely deal with a North American perspective on dirt. We will engage with American film (ex: Grapes of Wrath, Waterworld, Noma, Interstellar, The Martian, the Mad Max megaverse), and contemporary American literature.

Sustainability, Technology, and Policy

This course - taught on the Pacific Program - will develop a theoretical understanding of sustainability, from a bottom-up perspective that considers ecological outcomes as a function of human institutions. It begins with defining and understanding the tragedy of the commons, and develops an understanding of why we might not be doomed to this tragedy. While exploring broad themes in environmental ethics, philosophy, and management, it will explore cases in the Pacific context, and will include a service-learning project in Fiji.

Comics and Civic Engagement

In this course, students will create research-based comics about a topic related to urban development, particularly in relationship to Atlanta’s underserved West Side neighborhood.  They will then present these comics at an on campus exhibition with the goal of raising awareness about the issues and assets of the West Side. While comics may seem an odd fit for serious issues, many organizations--from the UN to the Alzheimer's Association--and authors have begun using them to explore and educate on such topics as climate change, medical issues, and violence against women.

The City in U.S. History

Through a combination of lectures, readings, and discussion, "The City in U.S. History" (HTS 3011) examines the nature of urban life throughout U.S.

Environmentalism and Ecocriticism

How have contemporary media, such as film, literature, architecture, photography, and computation, been used to shape popular conceptions of the environment, to challenge these conceptions and to propose radical alternatives? In this class, students will learn to analyze representations of the earth, nature, wildlife and wilderness in creative work across domains: a landscape by James Corner, a short story by Ursula K. La Guin, an installation by Natalie Jeremijenko, a film by Hayao Miyazaki, an interactive narrative by Jeremy Mendez and Leanne Allison.

Introduction to Global Development

This course introduces students to the history, theory and practice of international development. Students will examine the different meanings and objectives of global development, paying particular attention to economic growth, poverty alleviation, inequality reduction, capability enhancement, the defense of human rights and sustainability.

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