College of Liberal Arts

These tools correspond with the SLS Student Learning Outcomes

 

 

 

Course

Environmentalism and Ecocriticism

How have contemporary media, such as film, literature, architecture, photography, and computation, been used to shape popular conceptions of the environment, to challenge these conceptions and to propose radical alternatives? In this class, students will learn to analyze representations of the earth, nature, wildlife and wilderness in creative work across domains: a landscape by James Corner, a short story by Ursula K. La Guin, an installation by Natalie Jeremijenko, a film by Hayao Miyazaki, an interactive narrative by Jeremy Mendez and Leanne Allison.

Introduction to Global Development

This course introduces students to the history, theory and practice of international development. Students will examine the different meanings and objectives of global development, paying particular attention to economic growth, poverty alleviation, inequality reduction, capability enhancement, the defense of human rights and sustainability.

The History and Rhetoric of Science Writing for Children

Books for children, both fiction and non-fiction, can address scientific principles in creative ways in an attempt to educate, inform and excite young children. Hidden inside many classic children’s texts are broad scientific concepts like climate change (Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs), engineering (The Three Little Pigs), life cycles (The Very Hungry Caterpillar), and environmentalism (The Lorax). Other newer texts, like Babies Love Quarks are designed to help entice even the youngest children to love science, as a response to the STEM “crisis” in American education.

Climate Policy

This course aims to address the whole complexity of climate change, by bringing together the science of climate change, the analysis of impacts, and the economic and engineering strategies to reduce emissions.  In this class, students will be actively engaged in exploring the scientific and economic issues underlying the threat of global climate change and the institutions engaged in negotiating an international response.

Technology and Society

Technology and Society examines connections between the history of technology and other aspects of human history. The course uses historical episodes to challenge widely held misperceptions about technology and how it operates in the modern world. I argue that technology is a human product, not an autonomous force. Technology makes nothing happen by itself, but only as the result of human action. People can choose to design and use technology in different ways to better serve human needs.

Atlanta Studies: Reading, Documenting, Digitizing

My course will focus on Atlanta histories, texts, and communities.  We will read fiction of and about Atlanta, and I hope to coordinate with SLS on an oral history project that either makes use of oral history archives already accessible at Georgia Tech or produces a new archive in collaboration with nearby communities.  In either case, we will work with both SLS and the Living Building to preserve and present our work.

Science, Technology, and Human Values

This course is divided into two parts:  1. In the first part of the course, we will discuss a number of topics in food studies, including food justice, consumer ethics, food and identity, industrial plant and animal agriculture and alternatives; workers;  verconsumption and obesity, and paternalism and public health. Through this part, special attention will be paid to the concept of "sustainable communities" and to how various food-related decisions affect the ability of communities to function sustainably.

Sustainable Development and Climate Change: A Multidisciplinary Program in Italy

Sustainable Development and Climate Change: A Multidisciplinary Program in Italy enriches the standard content of the courses with many curricular and co-curricular activities in one of the richest cultural environments in the world.  Students will be based in Venice, the prototype of all cities that struggle for sustainable economic and environmental development and the poster child of cities menaced by sea-level rise.  During the program, students will learn and understand the key ingredients of a sustainable deve

Serve-Learn-Sustain in Spain

The Serve-Learn-Sustain in Spain program is offered each spring semester by the School of Modern Languages.  Take 12 to 15 credits of upper-division Spanish and earn a Spanish certificate (12 credits) or a Spanish minor (15 credits) in just four months abroad.

The Serve-Learn-Sustain in Spain program is based in Granada, Spain and combines intensive conversation practice with service-learning projects and sustainability studies.

Spain: Language for Business and Technology

The Spain: Language for Business and Technology (LBAT) Program examines the relationship between Spain and the European Union in the 21st century and then explores issues of social, economic, and environmental sustainability in the Spanish context.

Read our SLS Global Student Ambassador Blog Post for a student perspective on sustainable communities in Spain.

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